Maxine in Dunceland

Maxine Waters to Chris Hayes while defending her call for harassment of officials in Trump's Cabinet and administration:

As a matter of fact, I believe in peaceful protests.  I believe that protest is at the centerpiece of our democracy.  I believe that the Constitution guarantees us freedom of speech.  And I think that protest is civil protest.

Too many voters occupying Dunceland fall for this type of nonsensical alignment of coached up words.  We should look at this statement sentence by sentence in order to measure its depth.

1. One might believe in anything – Godzilla or the Big Rock Candy Mountain – but one would support peaceful protest.  Clear thoughts would by nature reveal themselves through concise expression.

2. Believing that protest is at the centerpiece of democracy sounds pretty, especially to those with a political chip on their shoulder and a tin ear for sentence structure, but protest is peripheral to democracy; you have your say in the voting booth.  One may protest laws applied unequally if perceived as injustice, but protesting a legally valid decision cast by fellow citizens is definitely not "at the centerpiece" of our democracy.  Encouraging dunces to shout, "Impeach 45," as Waters has done many times, impales democracy because it redirects a selfish disregard for fellow citizens and a desire to disenfranchise certain voters.  This brand of malevolence is at the centerpiece of Dunceland.

3. To be a politician, one must "believe" strongly, with all his heart, in something.  Waters doesn't know that the Constitution guarantees us freedom of speech; she believes that it does so.  One must also "feel" that 2 plus 2 is 4, as a dunce would, in order to buy into this rhetorical grease pan. 

4. Maxine winds up and tosses her best pitch: "And I think that protest is civil protest."  How can this go wrong?  Most of us think an elephant is an elephant.  Most of us, however, are also able to draw a distinction between an elephant and a rogue elephant.  A rogue elephant would be dangerous, just as some protests cross a line into damaging private property.  These displays of childish emotion could hardly be classified as "civil."  The protests staged by leftists are rarely civil – only a citizen of Dunceland would refer to a slogan like "F‑‑‑ Trump" as valuable contribution to civil discourse. 

If parsed and distilled, the depth of Maxine's words and thoughts could barely soak a gnat's big toe.  I don't blame Maxine; she only employs the empty catchphrases that have assumed a position of prominence at the centerpiece of an ideology designed for dunces. 

In this commentary, Maxine Waters is never referred to as a dunce.  The people who vote for her in election after election and those who defend her call for persecution may draw their own conclusions.  But the other night, Democratic U.S. rep. Joseph Crowley was defeated by 28-year-old Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, a member of the Democratic Socialists of America.  Think about that, and think about Venezuela for a moment. 

Then demand that all your level-headed friends and family go out and vote this November against the irrational dunces who would turn our nation into the Dunceland States of America.

Maxine Waters to Chris Hayes while defending her call for harassment of officials in Trump's Cabinet and administration:

As a matter of fact, I believe in peaceful protests.  I believe that protest is at the centerpiece of our democracy.  I believe that the Constitution guarantees us freedom of speech.  And I think that protest is civil protest.

Too many voters occupying Dunceland fall for this type of nonsensical alignment of coached up words.  We should look at this statement sentence by sentence in order to measure its depth.

1. One might believe in anything – Godzilla or the Big Rock Candy Mountain – but one would support peaceful protest.  Clear thoughts would by nature reveal themselves through concise expression.

2. Believing that protest is at the centerpiece of democracy sounds pretty, especially to those with a political chip on their shoulder and a tin ear for sentence structure, but protest is peripheral to democracy; you have your say in the voting booth.  One may protest laws applied unequally if perceived as injustice, but protesting a legally valid decision cast by fellow citizens is definitely not "at the centerpiece" of our democracy.  Encouraging dunces to shout, "Impeach 45," as Waters has done many times, impales democracy because it redirects a selfish disregard for fellow citizens and a desire to disenfranchise certain voters.  This brand of malevolence is at the centerpiece of Dunceland.

3. To be a politician, one must "believe" strongly, with all his heart, in something.  Waters doesn't know that the Constitution guarantees us freedom of speech; she believes that it does so.  One must also "feel" that 2 plus 2 is 4, as a dunce would, in order to buy into this rhetorical grease pan. 

4. Maxine winds up and tosses her best pitch: "And I think that protest is civil protest."  How can this go wrong?  Most of us think an elephant is an elephant.  Most of us, however, are also able to draw a distinction between an elephant and a rogue elephant.  A rogue elephant would be dangerous, just as some protests cross a line into damaging private property.  These displays of childish emotion could hardly be classified as "civil."  The protests staged by leftists are rarely civil – only a citizen of Dunceland would refer to a slogan like "F‑‑‑ Trump" as valuable contribution to civil discourse. 

If parsed and distilled, the depth of Maxine's words and thoughts could barely soak a gnat's big toe.  I don't blame Maxine; she only employs the empty catchphrases that have assumed a position of prominence at the centerpiece of an ideology designed for dunces. 

In this commentary, Maxine Waters is never referred to as a dunce.  The people who vote for her in election after election and those who defend her call for persecution may draw their own conclusions.  But the other night, Democratic U.S. rep. Joseph Crowley was defeated by 28-year-old Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, a member of the Democratic Socialists of America.  Think about that, and think about Venezuela for a moment. 

Then demand that all your level-headed friends and family go out and vote this November against the irrational dunces who would turn our nation into the Dunceland States of America.