Venezuela's dictator Maduro rigged his country's election – and is now terrified it's not rigged enough

Venezuela's odious dictator, former bus driver Nicolás Maduro, is already in hot water internationally for rigging his country's election when the phony snap vote is to be held on May 20.

He rigged the thing first by making it a snap election not all parties were prepared for, then by forbidding all of Venezuela's credible opposition leaders to run, and then by leaving just one puppet guy, a former Chavista named Henri Falcón, to be the placeholder opposition candidate to create the appearance of a race.

Apparently, even that's a problem.

Thursday, he bellowed that he'd be prepared to take up arms to make "revolución" if Falcón were to have the temerity to win.  The Miami Herald's estimable Jim Wyss reports:

Venezuelan President Nicolás Maduro is warning that he'll take up arms and lead a revolution if a government comes into power that wants to hand the country's "riches" to "imperialist" forces.

In a campaign speech Wednesday, Maduro – who is hoping to win a new six-year term in a highly questioned May 20 election – accused his nearest opposition rival, Henri Falcón, of wanting to sell the country out to "the gringos."

"If someday a government was in power that intend

Venezuela's odious dictator, former bus driver Nicolás Maduro, is already in hot water internationally for rigging his country's election when the phony snap vote is to be held on May 20.

He rigged the thing first by making it a snap election not all parties were prepared for, then by forbidding all of Venezuela's credible opposition leaders to run, and then by leaving just one puppet guy, a former Chavista named Henri Falcón, to be the placeholder opposition candidate to create the appearance of a race.

Apparently, even that's a problem.

Thursday, he bellowed that he'd be prepared to take up arms to make "revolución" if Falcón were to have the temerity to win.  The Miami Herald's estimable Jim Wyss reports:

Venezuelan President Nicolás Maduro is warning that he'll take up arms and lead a revolution if a government comes into power that wants to hand the country's "riches" to "imperialist" forces.

In a campaign speech Wednesday, Maduro – who is hoping to win a new six-year term in a highly questioned May 20 election – accused his nearest opposition rival, Henri Falcón, of wanting to sell the country out to "the gringos."

"If someday a government was in power that intended to hand over [our] riches, I would be the first one to raise the alarm, grab a gun and start an armed revolution with the people, if necessary," he told a crowd of supporters in Vargas.  "I would be the first one to do it, and call the people to arms."

His opponent, Falcón, a one-time government supporter turned dissident, is struggling to attract voters who are wary that going to the polls will legitimize a deeply flawed electoral process.  And most of the major opposition groups are calling for an outright boycott of the election.

He seems to be scared the guy might win anyway.

It's all phony stuff, the old "whip up the masses for la revolución strategy, in a ridiculous tinpot bid to take their minds off the country's 18,000% inflation and shortage-plagued and impoverished socialist economy.  Ah, la revolución and the "how beautiful is my flag" schtick, as Alvaro Vargas Llosa, Carlos Montaner, and Plinio Apuleyo Mendoza explained in their famous book about such creeps, called the Guide to the Perfect Latin American Idiot.  They have Maduro's number.

The fear factor is in more than just the absurd call to arms.  Maduro is also making threats of other sorts, some far more tangible to the voters, who are wary of the Chavista history of checking up on whom the voters are voting for through electronic voting.  A Reuters account that is otherwise good states that voting in Venezuela is secret, but that hasn't happened in previous elections, as voting machine companies have admitted that results were surveilled.  (Reuters probably should have written "nominally secret.")  Maduro warned workers they would lose their meager welfare benefits if they voted the wrong way, because voting was contingent on getting something with a Hitlerian name called a "Fatherland Card."

In his speech, Maduro told supporters that all those who vote showing a government-issued "Fatherland Card," which is needed to access certain welfare programs, probably would receive "a really good prize."

He did not give details but critics say that, and other pre-election cash and other bonuses via the card, is akin to vote bribery.  Voting in Venezuela is secret but state workers say they are constantly pressured to support the government.

Everyone knows the Venezuelan government is out of money and can't pay welfare benefits, so the promise of more from Maduro rings hollow.  Notice how in his quoted speech, he makes lots of blather about protecting the country's "riches," something that must make Venezuela's starving people gag.  He's got no money to pay welfare benefits, so all that is there is Maduro's willingness to use such empty threats alongside his empty calls for "revolución."

He's obviously running scared.  One hopes it will be as bad for the socialist ogre as he fears.

ed to hand over [our] riches, I would be the first one to raise the alarm, grab a gun and start an armed revolution with the people, if necessary," he told a crowd of supporters in Vargas.  "I would be the first one to do it, and call the people to arms."

 

His opponent, Falcón, a one-time government supporter turned dissident, is struggling to attract voters who are wary that going to the polls will legitimize a deeply flawed electoral process.  And most of the major opposition groups are calling for an outright boycott of the election.

He seems to be scared the guy might win anyway.

It's all phony stuff, the old "whip up the masses for la revolución strategy, in a ridiculous tinpot bid to take their minds off the country's 18,000% inflation and shortage-plagued and impoverished socialist economy.  Ah, la revolución and the "how beautiful is my flag" schtick, as Alvaro Vargas Llosa, Carlos Montaner, and Plinio Apuleyo Mendoza explained in their famous book about such creeps, called the Guide to the Perfect Latin American Idiot.  They have Maduro's number.

The fear factor is in more than just the absurd call to arms.  Maduro is also making threats of other sorts, some far more tangible to the voters, who are wary of the Chavista history of checking up on whom the voters are voting for through electronic voting.  A Reuters account that is otherwise good states that voting in Venezuela is secret, but that hasn't happened in previous elections, as voting machine companies have admitted that results were surveilled.  (Reuters probably should have written "nominally secret.")  Maduro warned workers they would lose their meager welfare benefits if they voted the wrong way, because voting was contingent on getting something with a Hitlerian name called a "Fatherland Card."

In his speech, Maduro told supporters that all those who vote showing a government-issued "Fatherland Card," which is needed to access certain welfare programs, probably would receive "a really good prize."

He did not give details but critics say that, and other pre-election cash and other bonuses via the card, is akin to vote bribery.  Voting in Venezuela is secret but state workers say they are constantly pressured to support the government.

Everyone knows the Venezuelan government is out of money and can't pay welfare benefits, so the promise of more from Maduro rings hollow.  Notice how in his quoted speech, he makes lots of blather about protecting the country's "riches," something that must make Venezuela's starving people gag.  He's got no money to pay welfare benefits, so all that is there is Maduro's willingness to use such empty threats alongside his empty calls for "revolución."

He's obviously running scared.  One hopes it will be as bad for the socialist ogre as he fears.

Venezuela's odious dictator, former bus driver Nicolás Maduro, is already in hot water internationally for rigging his country's election when the phony snap vote is to be held on May 20.

He rigged the thing first by making it a snap election not all parties were prepared for, then by forbidding all of Venezuela's credible opposition leaders to run, and then by leaving just one puppet guy, a former Chavista named Henri Falcón, to be the placeholder opposition candidate to create the appearance of a race.

Apparently, even that's a problem.

Thursday, he bellowed that he'd be prepared to take up arms to make "revolución" if Falcón were to have the temerity to win.  The Miami Herald's estimable Jim Wyss reports:

Venezuelan President Nicolás Maduro is warning that he'll take up arms and lead a revolution if a government comes into power that wants to hand the country's "riches" to "imperialist" forces.

In a campaign speech Wednesday, Maduro – who is hoping to win a new six-year term in a highly questioned May 20 election – accused his nearest opposition rival, Henri Falcón, of wanting to sell the country out to "the gringos."

"If someday a government was in power that intend

Venezuela's odious dictator, former bus driver Nicolás Maduro, is already in hot water internationally for rigging his country's election when the phony snap vote is to be held on May 20.

He rigged the thing first by making it a snap election not all parties were prepared for, then by forbidding all of Venezuela's credible opposition leaders to run, and then by leaving just one puppet guy, a former Chavista named Henri Falcón, to be the placeholder opposition candidate to create the appearance of a race.

Apparently, even that's a problem.

Thursday, he bellowed that he'd be prepared to take up arms to make "revolución" if Falcón were to have the temerity to win.  The Miami Herald's estimable Jim Wyss reports:

Venezuelan President Nicolás Maduro is warning that he'll take up arms and lead a revolution if a government comes into power that wants to hand the country's "riches" to "imperialist" forces.

In a campaign speech Wednesday, Maduro – who is hoping to win a new six-year term in a highly questioned May 20 election – accused his nearest opposition rival, Henri Falcón, of wanting to sell the country out to "the gringos."

"If someday a government was in power that intended to hand over [our] riches, I would be the first one to raise the alarm, grab a gun and start an armed revolution with the people, if necessary," he told a crowd of supporters in Vargas.  "I would be the first one to do it, and call the people to arms."

His opponent, Falcón, a one-time government supporter turned dissident, is struggling to attract voters who are wary that going to the polls will legitimize a deeply flawed electoral process.  And most of the major opposition groups are calling for an outright boycott of the election.

He seems to be scared the guy might win anyway.

It's all phony stuff, the old "whip up the masses for la revolución strategy, in a ridiculous tinpot bid to take their minds off the country's 18,000% inflation and shortage-plagued and impoverished socialist economy.  Ah, la revolución and the "how beautiful is my flag" schtick, as Alvaro Vargas Llosa, Carlos Montaner, and Plinio Apuleyo Mendoza explained in their famous book about such creeps, called the Guide to the Perfect Latin American Idiot.  They have Maduro's number.

The fear factor is in more than just the absurd call to arms.  Maduro is also making threats of other sorts, some far more tangible to the voters, who are wary of the Chavista history of checking up on whom the voters are voting for through electronic voting.  A Reuters account that is otherwise good states that voting in Venezuela is secret, but that hasn't happened in previous elections, as voting machine companies have admitted that results were surveilled.  (Reuters probably should have written "nominally secret.")  Maduro warned workers they would lose their meager welfare benefits if they voted the wrong way, because voting was contingent on getting something with a Hitlerian name called a "Fatherland Card."

In his speech, Maduro told supporters that all those who vote showing a government-issued "Fatherland Card," which is needed to access certain welfare programs, probably would receive "a really good prize."

He did not give details but critics say that, and other pre-election cash and other bonuses via the card, is akin to vote bribery.  Voting in Venezuela is secret but state workers say they are constantly pressured to support the government.

Everyone knows the Venezuelan government is out of money and can't pay welfare benefits, so the promise of more from Maduro rings hollow.  Notice how in his quoted speech, he makes lots of blather about protecting the country's "riches," something that must make Venezuela's starving people gag.  He's got no money to pay welfare benefits, so all that is there is Maduro's willingness to use such empty threats alongside his empty calls for "revolución."

He's obviously running scared.  One hopes it will be as bad for the socialist ogre as he fears.

ed to hand over [our] riches, I would be the first one to raise the alarm, grab a gun and start an armed revolution with the people, if necessary," he told a crowd of supporters in Vargas.  "I would be the first one to do it, and call the people to arms."

 

His opponent, Falcón, a one-time government supporter turned dissident, is struggling to attract voters who are wary that going to the polls will legitimize a deeply flawed electoral process.  And most of the major opposition groups are calling for an outright boycott of the election.

He seems to be scared the guy might win anyway.

It's all phony stuff, the old "whip up the masses for la revolución strategy, in a ridiculous tinpot bid to take their minds off the country's 18,000% inflation and shortage-plagued and impoverished socialist economy.  Ah, la revolución and the "how beautiful is my flag" schtick, as Alvaro Vargas Llosa, Carlos Montaner, and Plinio Apuleyo Mendoza explained in their famous book about such creeps, called the Guide to the Perfect Latin American Idiot.  They have Maduro's number.

The fear factor is in more than just the absurd call to arms.  Maduro is also making threats of other sorts, some far more tangible to the voters, who are wary of the Chavista history of checking up on whom the voters are voting for through electronic voting.  A Reuters account that is otherwise good states that voting in Venezuela is secret, but that hasn't happened in previous elections, as voting machine companies have admitted that results were surveilled.  (Reuters probably should have written "nominally secret.")  Maduro warned workers they would lose their meager welfare benefits if they voted the wrong way, because voting was contingent on getting something with a Hitlerian name called a "Fatherland Card."

In his speech, Maduro told supporters that all those who vote showing a government-issued "Fatherland Card," which is needed to access certain welfare programs, probably would receive "a really good prize."

He did not give details but critics say that, and other pre-election cash and other bonuses via the card, is akin to vote bribery.  Voting in Venezuela is secret but state workers say they are constantly pressured to support the government.

Everyone knows the Venezuelan government is out of money and can't pay welfare benefits, so the promise of more from Maduro rings hollow.  Notice how in his quoted speech, he makes lots of blather about protecting the country's "riches," something that must make Venezuela's starving people gag.  He's got no money to pay welfare benefits, so all that is there is Maduro's willingness to use such empty threats alongside his empty calls for "revolución."

He's obviously running scared.  One hopes it will be as bad for the socialist ogre as he fears.