Tick, tick, tick...for the Clinton Foundation

Charles Ortel, the retired Wall Street analyst who has examined thoroughly the many publicly available filings of the Bill, Hillary, and Chelsea Clinton Foundation, calls it "the biggest charity fraud ever."  He has got them dead to rights.

It is the first of a series of articles clearly intended to lay the foundation for indictments, which may well be the subject of a sitting grand jury.  And if not, there are a lot of questions to be answered.

The heart of the argument for today's installment:

The only purposes enumerated in the Clinton Foundation's articles of incorporation and application for federal tax exemption are to house records created or received during the Clinton presidency, to allow research into these records, and to endow facilities based in Little Rock, Arkansas.

A public charity cannot divert funds intended for its authorized mission to another tax-exempt purpose without clearing its new mission, in advance, with the IRS (see page 6) and then informing regulators in all relevant U.S. states that its mission has been changed by evidencing amended articles of incorporation that clearly explain its adjusted tax-exempt purposes.

The Clinton Foundation has attempted to amend its articles of incorporation several times to change its name, but not to add to, change, or otherwise revise its authorized purposes.  This means that the Clinton Foundation has never held lawful power to "fight HIV/AIDS" or "fight climate change" or provide disaster relief internationally or domestically, yet its many marketing brochures, public filings, and press releases detail radical alterations in professed purposes starting by 2002.

The foundation and its trustees clearly are operating as if the laws did not apply to them.  Had Hillary Clinton won the presidential election, this bet would have paid off.  But with a new sheriff in town, and Lois Lerner retired, time is running out.

Charles Ortel, the retired Wall Street analyst who has examined thoroughly the many publicly available filings of the Bill, Hillary, and Chelsea Clinton Foundation, calls it "the biggest charity fraud ever."  He has got them dead to rights.

It is the first of a series of articles clearly intended to lay the foundation for indictments, which may well be the subject of a sitting grand jury.  And if not, there are a lot of questions to be answered.

The heart of the argument for today's installment:

The only purposes enumerated in the Clinton Foundation's articles of incorporation and application for federal tax exemption are to house records created or received during the Clinton presidency, to allow research into these records, and to endow facilities based in Little Rock, Arkansas.

A public charity cannot divert funds intended for its authorized mission to another tax-exempt purpose without clearing its new mission, in advance, with the IRS (see page 6) and then informing regulators in all relevant U.S. states that its mission has been changed by evidencing amended articles of incorporation that clearly explain its adjusted tax-exempt purposes.

The Clinton Foundation has attempted to amend its articles of incorporation several times to change its name, but not to add to, change, or otherwise revise its authorized purposes.  This means that the Clinton Foundation has never held lawful power to "fight HIV/AIDS" or "fight climate change" or provide disaster relief internationally or domestically, yet its many marketing brochures, public filings, and press releases detail radical alterations in professed purposes starting by 2002.

The foundation and its trustees clearly are operating as if the laws did not apply to them.  Had Hillary Clinton won the presidential election, this bet would have paid off.  But with a new sheriff in town, and Lois Lerner retired, time is running out.