Joining the culture war: Non-PC sci-fi flick wins big in Houston

I read with great interest J.R. Dunn's blog post, "Science Fiction Goes PC," regarding the struggles and travails of science fiction-writer Jon Del Arroz, who was slandered, bullied, and then banned from WorldCon, the premiere annual jamboree for science fiction authors.

Del Arroz's offense?  He's conservative.  That is, his messages and themes are not "politically correct."  As Dunn cautions in his post, "[i]f the left succeeds in closing down one field, it will attempt the same in others, and the world will grow very narrow and very cold for those on the right."

Much to his credit, Del Arroz has taken the offensive against the offensive characters at WorldCon and filed a lawsuit against them.  Seeing a worthy cause, I made a donation to his lawsuit at this site here.

I was moved by Del Arroz's plight, as I have experienced the same type of prejudicial leftist resistance to my short film - a sci-fi/political farce titled Alien Anthropologists.  It's not an easy path for a writer presenting conservative themes, given that the parallel universe of the Hollywood/sci-fi cabal dominates and controls the media.

However, persistence can have its reward.  On Saturday April 28, I was gratified to receive a "Special Jury Remi Award" for my little movie at the 51st Annual WorldFest-Houston International Film Festival in Houston, Texas.  The "Special Jury" is their top-tier (A+) award at this festival, which is one of the biggest and longest running in the country.  My goal is to generate sufficient interest with my short film to produce the feature-length version of my story – not an easy proposition for a sci-fi film the themes of which are conservative.


Receiving the Special Jury Remi Award for Alien Anthropologists, April 28, 2018, at the 51st Annual WorldFest-Houston International Film Festival.  Left to Right: Christopher Ridder (co-producer), Hunter Todd (festival founder and director), Robert Kirk (writer and director).

My movie is a satirical commentary on the corruption of our political elites that takes place in a future America farther along the road to dystopian ruin.  I've renamed the FBI the Federal Investigation Bureau (the FIB for short), the director of which is named Lester Homey – rhymes with "Comey."  No, I'm not selling my story to the established Hollywood/sci-fi cabal.  They would gut the conservative message and replace it with something along the lines of transgendered aliens coming to Earth to save us from the dangers of anthropogenic climate change.

Anyway, apparently, there are a sufficient number of lowbrow deplorable knuckle-dragging fools like me living in and around Houston to appreciate conservative humor and in the context of science fiction, as they bestowed on our film their top most award at their Gala Awards Dinner this past Saturday.  No, festival directors and film critics didn't care for my hate-filled little screed at film festivals I submitted it to in Hollywood and the District of Columbia.  You would think I could have figured that out ahead of time and saved the entry fees.  Duuuh!

What was my motivation for writing this irreverent little comedy?  A story from my youth sheds light on the issue.  I relate this story not because I think there is any truth to the Trump-Russian collusion nonsense.  Rather, the following illustrates my father's deep and abiding compassion that ours is (or at least at that time was) "a nation of laws."

My dad was an appointee of Richard Nixon.  I had just graduated from high school at the time Watergate broke open and Nixon resigned.  I remember commenting to my father, "This is really bad for the Republican Party."  Dad responded, "No, son, its good.  It shows that we are a special people.  It shows that the law applies to the president just like the rest of us."

The Old Republic is certainly finished if we are no longer "a nation of laws" but instead a banana republic with one set of laws and procedures for our political elites and another set of laws and consequences for the rest of us.

Like the rest of you, I am righteously angry at the level of corruption in our entrenched federal bureaucracies and the breakdown of the equal and fair application of law.  But being a believer in the power of positive thinking, I determined to channel my frustration to humor and love.  And so I refused to write a tragedy.  Alien Anthropologists is a romantic comedy about an alien who becomes human and in the process saves humanity from itself.

You can take a look at a (less than four minute) trailer for Alien Anthropologists here.

If you are a fellow deplorable like me and would like to follow my movie, please visit the Alien Anthropologists website.  It contains more information about our movie and has a tab for joining our newsletter.

Robert Kirk, a retired prosecutor, suffers from a rare malady that afflicts only a tiny percentage of his fellow Californians: commonsense conservative thought.  To contact or to follow his current politically incorrect project, go to www.alienanthro.com.

I read with great interest J.R. Dunn's blog post, "Science Fiction Goes PC," regarding the struggles and travails of science fiction-writer Jon Del Arroz, who was slandered, bullied, and then banned from WorldCon, the premiere annual jamboree for science fiction authors.

Del Arroz's offense?  He's conservative.  That is, his messages and themes are not "politically correct."  As Dunn cautions in his post, "[i]f the left succeeds in closing down one field, it will attempt the same in others, and the world will grow very narrow and very cold for those on the right."

Much to his credit, Del Arroz has taken the offensive against the offensive characters at WorldCon and filed a lawsuit against them.  Seeing a worthy cause, I made a donation to his lawsuit at this site here.

I was moved by Del Arroz's plight, as I have experienced the same type of prejudicial leftist resistance to my short film - a sci-fi/political farce titled Alien Anthropologists.  It's not an easy path for a writer presenting conservative themes, given that the parallel universe of the Hollywood/sci-fi cabal dominates and controls the media.

However, persistence can have its reward.  On Saturday April 28, I was gratified to receive a "Special Jury Remi Award" for my little movie at the 51st Annual WorldFest-Houston International Film Festival in Houston, Texas.  The "Special Jury" is their top-tier (A+) award at this festival, which is one of the biggest and longest running in the country.  My goal is to generate sufficient interest with my short film to produce the feature-length version of my story – not an easy proposition for a sci-fi film the themes of which are conservative.


Receiving the Special Jury Remi Award for Alien Anthropologists, April 28, 2018, at the 51st Annual WorldFest-Houston International Film Festival.  Left to Right: Christopher Ridder (co-producer), Hunter Todd (festival founder and director), Robert Kirk (writer and director).

My movie is a satirical commentary on the corruption of our political elites that takes place in a future America farther along the road to dystopian ruin.  I've renamed the FBI the Federal Investigation Bureau (the FIB for short), the director of which is named Lester Homey – rhymes with "Comey."  No, I'm not selling my story to the established Hollywood/sci-fi cabal.  They would gut the conservative message and replace it with something along the lines of transgendered aliens coming to Earth to save us from the dangers of anthropogenic climate change.

Anyway, apparently, there are a sufficient number of lowbrow deplorable knuckle-dragging fools like me living in and around Houston to appreciate conservative humor and in the context of science fiction, as they bestowed on our film their top most award at their Gala Awards Dinner this past Saturday.  No, festival directors and film critics didn't care for my hate-filled little screed at film festivals I submitted it to in Hollywood and the District of Columbia.  You would think I could have figured that out ahead of time and saved the entry fees.  Duuuh!

What was my motivation for writing this irreverent little comedy?  A story from my youth sheds light on the issue.  I relate this story not because I think there is any truth to the Trump-Russian collusion nonsense.  Rather, the following illustrates my father's deep and abiding compassion that ours is (or at least at that time was) "a nation of laws."

My dad was an appointee of Richard Nixon.  I had just graduated from high school at the time Watergate broke open and Nixon resigned.  I remember commenting to my father, "This is really bad for the Republican Party."  Dad responded, "No, son, its good.  It shows that we are a special people.  It shows that the law applies to the president just like the rest of us."

The Old Republic is certainly finished if we are no longer "a nation of laws" but instead a banana republic with one set of laws and procedures for our political elites and another set of laws and consequences for the rest of us.

Like the rest of you, I am righteously angry at the level of corruption in our entrenched federal bureaucracies and the breakdown of the equal and fair application of law.  But being a believer in the power of positive thinking, I determined to channel my frustration to humor and love.  And so I refused to write a tragedy.  Alien Anthropologists is a romantic comedy about an alien who becomes human and in the process saves humanity from itself.

You can take a look at a (less than four minute) trailer for Alien Anthropologists here.

If you are a fellow deplorable like me and would like to follow my movie, please visit the Alien Anthropologists website.  It contains more information about our movie and has a tab for joining our newsletter.

Robert Kirk, a retired prosecutor, suffers from a rare malady that afflicts only a tiny percentage of his fellow Californians: commonsense conservative thought.  To contact or to follow his current politically incorrect project, go to www.alienanthro.com.