Thrashing around with a non-story on collusion, the press gets despicable

Remember that popular song, "Dirty Laundry," about the piggishness of the press, by Eagles frontman Don Henley?

Well, it's all come to life and isn't such a parody anymore.  Mike Allen, who rightfully acted as the adult in the room with his chiding of the press as it grasped for straws in the decaying rubble of Special Counsel Robert Mueller's Russian collusion investigation, has now given the press a new smack-down in its shameful exploitation of an obviously fragile man of no consequence to the news: Sam Nunberg.

Nunberg is a former Trump aide who left the Trump camp in 2015.  Like a lot of people, he got a subpoena over tangential things from Mueller, who seems to be now grasping for anything he can to pin on Trump ("the dog, the cat, the rhododendron," as Tom Wolfe put it in The Right Stuff), ushering in his interaction with the news.

The television media then seized on Nunberg, who was obviously a fragile man, and jumped on his initial claim that he would not cooperate with the Mueller subpoena before a grand jury, and then his second claim that he would cooperate after all.  Then one of them claimed that Nunberg, who obviously hadn't thought much of this through, smelled of alcohol, a creepy cheap shot, given that if he really did, it would be inappropriate to have him on the news at all.  Nunberg has nothing of value to give Mueller, Allen noted, and it was obviously another case of what Allen called a "gabby witness."

But they exploited the fragile man, with zero respect for his well-being, given that he was a supporter of President Trump.

This is "awful scandal porn" and what makes people hate the press, Allen noted.

If the press is that desperate to turn something up with collusion, why don't reporters go after Mexico and Australia, which are both rather prominent in attempting to interfere with the U.S. election in 2016?

Guess we all know the answer to that.  The reality is, they are out to "Get Trump" and will use any means necessary – including this cost to their own credibility.  Dirty laundry, indeed.

Remember that popular song, "Dirty Laundry," about the piggishness of the press, by Eagles frontman Don Henley?

Well, it's all come to life and isn't such a parody anymore.  Mike Allen, who rightfully acted as the adult in the room with his chiding of the press as it grasped for straws in the decaying rubble of Special Counsel Robert Mueller's Russian collusion investigation, has now given the press a new smack-down in its shameful exploitation of an obviously fragile man of no consequence to the news: Sam Nunberg.

Nunberg is a former Trump aide who left the Trump camp in 2015.  Like a lot of people, he got a subpoena over tangential things from Mueller, who seems to be now grasping for anything he can to pin on Trump ("the dog, the cat, the rhododendron," as Tom Wolfe put it in The Right Stuff), ushering in his interaction with the news.

The television media then seized on Nunberg, who was obviously a fragile man, and jumped on his initial claim that he would not cooperate with the Mueller subpoena before a grand jury, and then his second claim that he would cooperate after all.  Then one of them claimed that Nunberg, who obviously hadn't thought much of this through, smelled of alcohol, a creepy cheap shot, given that if he really did, it would be inappropriate to have him on the news at all.  Nunberg has nothing of value to give Mueller, Allen noted, and it was obviously another case of what Allen called a "gabby witness."

But they exploited the fragile man, with zero respect for his well-being, given that he was a supporter of President Trump.

This is "awful scandal porn" and what makes people hate the press, Allen noted.

If the press is that desperate to turn something up with collusion, why don't reporters go after Mexico and Australia, which are both rather prominent in attempting to interfere with the U.S. election in 2016?

Guess we all know the answer to that.  The reality is, they are out to "Get Trump" and will use any means necessary – including this cost to their own credibility.  Dirty laundry, indeed.