SJW banks on 'white guilt' to overcharge diners

Mr. Tunde Wey figured out the best way to shake down white customers at his restaurant – ironically named Civil Eats – in New Orleans.

He cleverly manipulates white diners into paying higher prices than listed on the menu by first dishing out lectures about wealth inequality.  "I start by asking patrons what they think the racial wealth gap is and then share stats," Mr. Wey offers while describing his serving routine.  "Then how it manifests in New Orleans and nationally."

No one understands the value of "white guilt" (his words) better than Mr. Wey at the small eatery.  "Refusing to pay more comes off as anti-social," remarks Mr. Wey, "[a]nd people don't want to be judged for that." 

Timing appears to be part of the shakedown.  First Mr. Wey takes the customer's order, serves up the social warrior in-your-face remarks, and then turns to the customer to ask: "So, how much do you want to pay?"  Don't bother answering the question, because the restaurateur can even suggest an inflated price.

White customers have a choice – according to the social justice warrior – of paying the suggested inflated $30.00 over the $12.00 menu price.  Wow!  That's more than 100 percent over the usual fare.  Then again, the white customer is afforded the opportunity to buy the biggest serving of baloney this side of the Mississippi.

Of course, black customers are charged $12, plus given the option to pocket the white customer's $18.00 overpayment.  Can you follow the money trail?  All things considered, that means that black customers who accept the creative payment plan enjoy a free lunch, all the while pocketing a few extra dollars.

This creative sliding scale doesn't allow Mr. Wey to factor in the "Oprah Principle."  Oprah Winfrey is the richest woman in entertainment because of three simple rules: she worked hard, harder, and among the hardest in her culturally disadvantaged community, including her birthplace, Kosclusko, Miss.  She deserves her title as the Queen of Media for her indefatigable work ethic, commitment to education, and refusal to throw a race-inspired pity-party for herself.

Mr. Wey does not have to rely on anecdotal evidence to blow apart his fallacious logic: apparently, "whitey" is not responsible for the financial inequities suffered in the black or Hispanic community, according to the Brookings Institution in D.C., which conducts exhaustive research into education, economics, and social sciences. 

My immigrant grandmother could have come up with the same findings as the fancy non-profit institution for getting ahead in life and avoiding the pitfalls of poverty.  The commonsense guidelines include three major principles: strive to achieve an education (at the very least, graduate high school), never have a child out of wedlock (as much for yourself as the child), and retain employment (achieving the pinnacle of success through tireless work).

It's a good thing Mr. Wey would never run into my grandmother of blessed memory: she could never be shamed into picking up a tab that didn't belong to her, nor would she ever place an expectation on a complete stranger to pick up a tab that she had run up.

Mr. Tunde Wey figured out the best way to shake down white customers at his restaurant – ironically named Civil Eats – in New Orleans.

He cleverly manipulates white diners into paying higher prices than listed on the menu by first dishing out lectures about wealth inequality.  "I start by asking patrons what they think the racial wealth gap is and then share stats," Mr. Wey offers while describing his serving routine.  "Then how it manifests in New Orleans and nationally."

No one understands the value of "white guilt" (his words) better than Mr. Wey at the small eatery.  "Refusing to pay more comes off as anti-social," remarks Mr. Wey, "[a]nd people don't want to be judged for that." 

Timing appears to be part of the shakedown.  First Mr. Wey takes the customer's order, serves up the social warrior in-your-face remarks, and then turns to the customer to ask: "So, how much do you want to pay?"  Don't bother answering the question, because the restaurateur can even suggest an inflated price.

White customers have a choice – according to the social justice warrior – of paying the suggested inflated $30.00 over the $12.00 menu price.  Wow!  That's more than 100 percent over the usual fare.  Then again, the white customer is afforded the opportunity to buy the biggest serving of baloney this side of the Mississippi.

Of course, black customers are charged $12, plus given the option to pocket the white customer's $18.00 overpayment.  Can you follow the money trail?  All things considered, that means that black customers who accept the creative payment plan enjoy a free lunch, all the while pocketing a few extra dollars.

This creative sliding scale doesn't allow Mr. Wey to factor in the "Oprah Principle."  Oprah Winfrey is the richest woman in entertainment because of three simple rules: she worked hard, harder, and among the hardest in her culturally disadvantaged community, including her birthplace, Kosclusko, Miss.  She deserves her title as the Queen of Media for her indefatigable work ethic, commitment to education, and refusal to throw a race-inspired pity-party for herself.

Mr. Wey does not have to rely on anecdotal evidence to blow apart his fallacious logic: apparently, "whitey" is not responsible for the financial inequities suffered in the black or Hispanic community, according to the Brookings Institution in D.C., which conducts exhaustive research into education, economics, and social sciences. 

My immigrant grandmother could have come up with the same findings as the fancy non-profit institution for getting ahead in life and avoiding the pitfalls of poverty.  The commonsense guidelines include three major principles: strive to achieve an education (at the very least, graduate high school), never have a child out of wedlock (as much for yourself as the child), and retain employment (achieving the pinnacle of success through tireless work).

It's a good thing Mr. Wey would never run into my grandmother of blessed memory: she could never be shamed into picking up a tab that didn't belong to her, nor would she ever place an expectation on a complete stranger to pick up a tab that she had run up.