MSM scramble to find reasons to ridicule Trump's North Korea triumph

If you expected the media to hail North Korea's urgent request for talks –from the position of supplicant – you have underestimated the force of Trump Derangement Syndrome.  Only one mainstream media figure came close to acknowledging the potential for greatness.  Poor Erin Burnett of CNN apparently didn't get the message before going on air and acknowledging the upside potential of this development.

Lawrence Bonk of the Media Research Center:

CNN's Erin Burnett had some startling words for the president, should he pull off denuclearizing the country.

Burnett actually said that he would go down as a "great president" if his talks with Jong Un go well.

Here is the full quote.

"Just an extraordinary evening and, of course, opening the door to the big question," she said. "If President Trump could truly solve this problem, that would be going down as a great president. There is no getting around that."

Others, with more time to think it over and develop snark, layered on the scorn.  One gambit was to liken the two national leaders to each other, thereby denigrating Trump as eerily like the ruthless dictator who assassinated his own brother.  Peter Bakerin the New York Times:

[I]n his penchant for unpredictability, his willingness to shift at a moment's notice and his sense that only he can make the important decisions, Mr. Trump may find a kindred spirit in the man who would sit across the table, Kim Jong-un of North Korea.

Karen deYoung in the Washington Post also found some similarity between "Kim and Trump, two notably volatile leaders who have traded public insults for more than a year[.]"

Others claimed that by agreeing to face-to-face talks, Trump has handed a win to North Korea, which long has desired the legitimizing that such acknowledgement of North Korean sovereignty would entail.  DeYoung for example:

By some assessments, this is really a victory for Kim, who for years has sought proof of his status and North Korea's power by dangling the offer of leader-to-leader talks with the United States.

There is some legitimacy to this position, but the surrounding circumstances mitigate any notion that North Korea is not desperate, since it has made its request with urgency, has unilaterally offered to suspend its test programs, and has dropped its previous insistence that U.S.-South Korea joint military exercises halt as a condition of talks.

But for the most extreme snark, one has to plumb the depth of the NeverTrumps on the right.  Steve Berman of The Resurgent is certain that Trump has already blown it:

The oldest trick in the book for a small, unknown competitor is to challenge the biggest company to a high-stakes test.  And the big company never, ever goes for it because they [sic] can only lose.

Except President Trump.  He fell for it with Kim Jong Un, who has absolutely nothing to lose and everything to gain by being in the press face to face with the President of the United States.  Maybe Trump considers this "winning" economically against a country which has no moral issue starving every single civilian within its borders, wiping out whole families because one member read a Bible, kidnapping an American student on a fluff charge and then shipping him home irreversibly brain-damaged and days from death.

Samantha Vinograd, of the Obama national security adviser's staffer that did nothing to stop North Korea's nuke program, is dead certain that there simply is not enough time, a view from within the box of failed diplomacy:

Translation: We couldn’t accomplish anything, so Trump can't, either.

Caricature of Kim Jong-un by DonkeyHotey.

If you expected the media to hail North Korea's urgent request for talks –from the position of supplicant – you have underestimated the force of Trump Derangement Syndrome.  Only one mainstream media figure came close to acknowledging the potential for greatness.  Poor Erin Burnett of CNN apparently didn't get the message before going on air and acknowledging the upside potential of this development.

Lawrence Bonk of the Media Research Center:

CNN's Erin Burnett had some startling words for the president, should he pull off denuclearizing the country.

Burnett actually said that he would go down as a "great president" if his talks with Jong Un go well.

Here is the full quote.

"Just an extraordinary evening and, of course, opening the door to the big question," she said. "If President Trump could truly solve this problem, that would be going down as a great president. There is no getting around that."

Others, with more time to think it over and develop snark, layered on the scorn.  One gambit was to liken the two national leaders to each other, thereby denigrating Trump as eerily like the ruthless dictator who assassinated his own brother.  Peter Bakerin the New York Times:

[I]n his penchant for unpredictability, his willingness to shift at a moment's notice and his sense that only he can make the important decisions, Mr. Trump may find a kindred spirit in the man who would sit across the table, Kim Jong-un of North Korea.

Karen deYoung in the Washington Post also found some similarity between "Kim and Trump, two notably volatile leaders who have traded public insults for more than a year[.]"

Others claimed that by agreeing to face-to-face talks, Trump has handed a win to North Korea, which long has desired the legitimizing that such acknowledgement of North Korean sovereignty would entail.  DeYoung for example:

By some assessments, this is really a victory for Kim, who for years has sought proof of his status and North Korea's power by dangling the offer of leader-to-leader talks with the United States.

There is some legitimacy to this position, but the surrounding circumstances mitigate any notion that North Korea is not desperate, since it has made its request with urgency, has unilaterally offered to suspend its test programs, and has dropped its previous insistence that U.S.-South Korea joint military exercises halt as a condition of talks.

But for the most extreme snark, one has to plumb the depth of the NeverTrumps on the right.  Steve Berman of The Resurgent is certain that Trump has already blown it:

The oldest trick in the book for a small, unknown competitor is to challenge the biggest company to a high-stakes test.  And the big company never, ever goes for it because they [sic] can only lose.

Except President Trump.  He fell for it with Kim Jong Un, who has absolutely nothing to lose and everything to gain by being in the press face to face with the President of the United States.  Maybe Trump considers this "winning" economically against a country which has no moral issue starving every single civilian within its borders, wiping out whole families because one member read a Bible, kidnapping an American student on a fluff charge and then shipping him home irreversibly brain-damaged and days from death.

Samantha Vinograd, of the Obama national security adviser's staffer that did nothing to stop North Korea's nuke program, is dead certain that there simply is not enough time, a view from within the box of failed diplomacy:

Translation: We couldn’t accomplish anything, so Trump can't, either.

Caricature of Kim Jong-un by DonkeyHotey.