It's sweetness and light between NRA and Trump after he chummed the water on gun control

When President Trump made his startling comment during bipartisan televised White House gun discussions about taking guns first and due process later, I suspected he was doing the same thing he had done during similar immigration discussions a few weeks earlier.  He likes to toss out ideas and let them be debated.

He heartens his opponents, and because they are so emotionally driven, they overreach, and he comes across looking reasonable while they look extreme. 

His proposal for a deal, when it comes, seems reasonable to the public.  

This is "unpresidential" behavior because in the previously existing culture of politics, a president must not speak until all the implications and ramifications of an idea have been researched and buttoned down.

But for President Trump, being unpresidential is not bug.  It is a feature.

This time, as with illegal immigration, his opponents, intoxicated by what they eagerly embrace as a wedge between the president and his enthusiastic backers in the Civil Rights Movement, Second Amendment Division, let it all hang out, as Susan Ferrechio of the Examiner reported yesterday afternoon: "Democrats to propose weapons ban, gun confiscation powers in bill inspired by Trump."

Shortly after this came out, news arrived that the NRA's Chris Cox had met with the POTUS in the Oval Office and is confident that the Second Amendment is quite safe.

President Trump followed with his own tweet:

His critics insist that President Trump is childish, unpresidential, and unreliable.  And they keep getting outsmarted.  Go figure.

When President Trump made his startling comment during bipartisan televised White House gun discussions about taking guns first and due process later, I suspected he was doing the same thing he had done during similar immigration discussions a few weeks earlier.  He likes to toss out ideas and let them be debated.

He heartens his opponents, and because they are so emotionally driven, they overreach, and he comes across looking reasonable while they look extreme. 

His proposal for a deal, when it comes, seems reasonable to the public.  

This is "unpresidential" behavior because in the previously existing culture of politics, a president must not speak until all the implications and ramifications of an idea have been researched and buttoned down.

But for President Trump, being unpresidential is not bug.  It is a feature.

This time, as with illegal immigration, his opponents, intoxicated by what they eagerly embrace as a wedge between the president and his enthusiastic backers in the Civil Rights Movement, Second Amendment Division, let it all hang out, as Susan Ferrechio of the Examiner reported yesterday afternoon: "Democrats to propose weapons ban, gun confiscation powers in bill inspired by Trump."

Shortly after this came out, news arrived that the NRA's Chris Cox had met with the POTUS in the Oval Office and is confident that the Second Amendment is quite safe.

President Trump followed with his own tweet:

His critics insist that President Trump is childish, unpresidential, and unreliable.  And they keep getting outsmarted.  Go figure.