#BLM protestors shut down light rail line in Minneapolis to protest a game in which black millionaires predominate

Light rail lines are part of the progressive utopian vision, as part of the program to get people out of automobiles and living in apartments within walking distance of a transit station – just like they seen on visits to Europe. They hate suburbia and houses  with ample yards and lots.

But that didn’t matter to the Black Lives Matter-identifying protestors who needed to make a statement by disrupting some aspect of the Super Bowl in Minneapolis yesterday.  I suspect that few of them care about suburban life one way or another, in their focus on big city police.

The excuse the #BLM disruptors used was that the Green Line, which runs from downtown to MSP Airport and Mall of America (and thousands of hotel rooms near those visitor magnets) was reserved for Super Bowl ticket-holders on the day of game, so as to be able to accommodate thousands of them on a timely basis.

Think Progress reports:

The protesters explained their rationale in a statement:

Activists are using this moment to stand with athletes who have protested throughout the past two football seasons calling attention to the murder of Black people by police and to the City of Minneapolis’ banning city residents from using public transit without a Super Bowl ticket.

So, block it they did:

KARE-TV News

Minnesota Public Radio reports:

Police removed 17 protesters after a group blocked Metro Transit light rail trains on the Green Line near the University of Minnesota's West Bank for about an hour Sunday afternoon.

Metro Transit officers removed, but did not arrest the protesters, said transit spokesman Howie Padilla. They were cited with unlawful interference with transit, Padilla said.

All protesters appeared to be adults.

Both eastbound and westbound lands were cleared by 4:15 p.m. No one was injured.

Padilla said representatives from the American Civil Liberties Union were at the scene and helped officers facilitate the removals.

All in all, a very Minnesota-style (not at all Philadelphia-style) protest, not really destroying much, or even apparently causing anyone to miss the game.

Before the game, nobody took the knee during the National Anthem, although a few players’ fists were raised. Meanwhile, on the field, two teams, in a league staffed with a large majority of black players receiving millions of dollars a year in salaries, contended with each other, occasionally inflicting physical harm on one another.

Sixty-five years ago, Marlon Brando, in the movie The Wild One, offered the definitive statement on such protests:

Light rail lines are part of the progressive utopian vision, as part of the program to get people out of automobiles and living in apartments within walking distance of a transit station – just like they seen on visits to Europe. They hate suburbia and houses  with ample yards and lots.

But that didn’t matter to the Black Lives Matter-identifying protestors who needed to make a statement by disrupting some aspect of the Super Bowl in Minneapolis yesterday.  I suspect that few of them care about suburban life one way or another, in their focus on big city police.

The excuse the #BLM disruptors used was that the Green Line, which runs from downtown to MSP Airport and Mall of America (and thousands of hotel rooms near those visitor magnets) was reserved for Super Bowl ticket-holders on the day of game, so as to be able to accommodate thousands of them on a timely basis.

Think Progress reports:

The protesters explained their rationale in a statement:

Activists are using this moment to stand with athletes who have protested throughout the past two football seasons calling attention to the murder of Black people by police and to the City of Minneapolis’ banning city residents from using public transit without a Super Bowl ticket.

So, block it they did:

KARE-TV News

Minnesota Public Radio reports:

Police removed 17 protesters after a group blocked Metro Transit light rail trains on the Green Line near the University of Minnesota's West Bank for about an hour Sunday afternoon.

Metro Transit officers removed, but did not arrest the protesters, said transit spokesman Howie Padilla. They were cited with unlawful interference with transit, Padilla said.

All protesters appeared to be adults.

Both eastbound and westbound lands were cleared by 4:15 p.m. No one was injured.

Padilla said representatives from the American Civil Liberties Union were at the scene and helped officers facilitate the removals.

All in all, a very Minnesota-style (not at all Philadelphia-style) protest, not really destroying much, or even apparently causing anyone to miss the game.

Before the game, nobody took the knee during the National Anthem, although a few players’ fists were raised. Meanwhile, on the field, two teams, in a league staffed with a large majority of black players receiving millions of dollars a year in salaries, contended with each other, occasionally inflicting physical harm on one another.

Sixty-five years ago, Marlon Brando, in the movie The Wild One, offered the definitive statement on such protests: