Maybe that border fence would help Mexico, too

Over the last few years, I've had conversations with Mexican friends who agree that the proposed border fence could actually be very helpful to stop guns and cash going south every day. It could also have an impact on the human traffic and drugs going north every day. We get drugs and they get billions of dollars in cash. They get guns and we get people coming in anyway imaginable.

This is a very sad but too common problem:

Nearly 200 people from Mexico and Central America were stuffed inside large trucks and caught trying to enter the United States illegally during three huge January smuggling busts that occurred in just nine days.

Officials in southern California said 77 people, including five children, were found near the Mexico border Monday packed inside a sweltering truck that had been painted to resemble a UPS truck.

It raises a couple of questions:

1) Who checks what comes out of Mexico? Are there any controls in place on the Mexico side of the U.S.-Mexico border?  The answer is complicated. They tell me that there are controls in some populated areas but it's wide open in others.

2) Why isn't Mexico doing a better job controlling the human flow from Central America? Complicated again. The cartels are now moving people through the country. They can buy their way from town to town. They travel on protected routes, or so they tell me.

We feel sorry for the poor people found in these trucks. Nevertheless, it's time to publicly call out Mexico and demand more effort on their side of the border. At least, we should point out the benefits of a border fence to stop this terrible stuff going north and south.

P.S. You can listen to my show (Canto Talk) and follow me on Twitter.

Over the last few years, I've had conversations with Mexican friends who agree that the proposed border fence could actually be very helpful to stop guns and cash going south every day. It could also have an impact on the human traffic and drugs going north every day. We get drugs and they get billions of dollars in cash. They get guns and we get people coming in anyway imaginable.

This is a very sad but too common problem:

Nearly 200 people from Mexico and Central America were stuffed inside large trucks and caught trying to enter the United States illegally during three huge January smuggling busts that occurred in just nine days.

Officials in southern California said 77 people, including five children, were found near the Mexico border Monday packed inside a sweltering truck that had been painted to resemble a UPS truck.

It raises a couple of questions:

1) Who checks what comes out of Mexico? Are there any controls in place on the Mexico side of the U.S.-Mexico border?  The answer is complicated. They tell me that there are controls in some populated areas but it's wide open in others.

2) Why isn't Mexico doing a better job controlling the human flow from Central America? Complicated again. The cartels are now moving people through the country. They can buy their way from town to town. They travel on protected routes, or so they tell me.

We feel sorry for the poor people found in these trucks. Nevertheless, it's time to publicly call out Mexico and demand more effort on their side of the border. At least, we should point out the benefits of a border fence to stop this terrible stuff going north and south.

P.S. You can listen to my show (Canto Talk) and follow me on Twitter.