What kind of a doofus is running Hawaii?

Haven't we always been warned of the nightmare of nuclear codes falling into the hands of ignorant third-world boobs?  Somehow, that calls to mind the recent incident in Hawaii of a false nuclear alarm and the governor who delayed advising the public because he...couldn't find his Twitter password.  We've met the galoot – and he's here.

According to the Honolulu Star-Advertiser:

Gov. David Ige told reporters today that part of the delay in notifying the public that the Jan. 13 ballistic missile alert was a false alarm was that he did not know his Twitter account password.

The Hawaii Emergency Management Agency issued the false alarm at 8:07 a.m., and Ige was told [that] the missile alert was a false alarm two minutes after the alert was sent to cell phones across the state.  However, Ige's office did not get out a cancellation message until 17 minutes after the alert.

Ige was asked about that delay when he met with reporters after his State of the State address today, and he said that "I was in the process of making calls to the leadership team both in Hawaii Emergency Management as well as others."

Ige added that "I have to confess that I don't know my Twitter account log-ons and the passwords, so certainly that's one of the changes that I've made.  I've been putting that on my phone so that we can access the social media directly."

The left-wing Hawaiian Democrat ended up causing tremendous distress in his state for that little omission.  Maybe not everyone is Twitter-savvy, and that's OK, but to have an account and then not know how to access it is inexcusable in a top official in a time of crisis.  If Twitter is the means by which a sizable percentage of the population gets its news, it's a blunder to allow it to go unaddressed.  Even a staff member can take care of it – which is what Ige's Twitter account now says.

Caught unawares, the whole thing is a comedy of error piled up upon error, starting with the initial launch warning, done by a low-level worker, and ricocheting to the governor's office, where the poor dork was searching for his sign-in and password.

Pretty pathetic to see this in a Democrat, given their claims to being the party of "progress."  Hillary Clinton was another such example from that party.

The whole thing points to poor contingency planning for emergencies in the vulnerable Pacific state – and raises questions about the rest of Hawaii's contingency planning.  With a governor that deep in the dark during a supposed nuclear attack, one wonders what else he has no idea about.

Haven't we always been warned of the nightmare of nuclear codes falling into the hands of ignorant third-world boobs?  Somehow, that calls to mind the recent incident in Hawaii of a false nuclear alarm and the governor who delayed advising the public because he...couldn't find his Twitter password.  We've met the galoot – and he's here.

According to the Honolulu Star-Advertiser:

Gov. David Ige told reporters today that part of the delay in notifying the public that the Jan. 13 ballistic missile alert was a false alarm was that he did not know his Twitter account password.

The Hawaii Emergency Management Agency issued the false alarm at 8:07 a.m., and Ige was told [that] the missile alert was a false alarm two minutes after the alert was sent to cell phones across the state.  However, Ige's office did not get out a cancellation message until 17 minutes after the alert.

Ige was asked about that delay when he met with reporters after his State of the State address today, and he said that "I was in the process of making calls to the leadership team both in Hawaii Emergency Management as well as others."

Ige added that "I have to confess that I don't know my Twitter account log-ons and the passwords, so certainly that's one of the changes that I've made.  I've been putting that on my phone so that we can access the social media directly."

The left-wing Hawaiian Democrat ended up causing tremendous distress in his state for that little omission.  Maybe not everyone is Twitter-savvy, and that's OK, but to have an account and then not know how to access it is inexcusable in a top official in a time of crisis.  If Twitter is the means by which a sizable percentage of the population gets its news, it's a blunder to allow it to go unaddressed.  Even a staff member can take care of it – which is what Ige's Twitter account now says.

Caught unawares, the whole thing is a comedy of error piled up upon error, starting with the initial launch warning, done by a low-level worker, and ricocheting to the governor's office, where the poor dork was searching for his sign-in and password.

Pretty pathetic to see this in a Democrat, given their claims to being the party of "progress."  Hillary Clinton was another such example from that party.

The whole thing points to poor contingency planning for emergencies in the vulnerable Pacific state – and raises questions about the rest of Hawaii's contingency planning.  With a governor that deep in the dark during a supposed nuclear attack, one wonders what else he has no idea about.