There's Trump's frankness on immigration, and then there's Lindsey Graham's hypocrisy...

The outrage over President Trump's supposed "s-hole" comment, which was about questioning whether the U.S. should be importing large numbers of nationals from dysfunctional countries, has drawn the hypocrites out of the woodwork.  One of the loudest out there harrumphing has been South Carolina's Sen. Lindsey Graham, who, much to the New York Times' glee, admonished Trump that "America is an idea, not a race."  Yet when Graham said in 2013, "The people coming across the southern border live in hellholes.  They don't like that.  They want to come here.  Our problem is, we can't have everybody in the world who lives in a hellhole come to America," was it the truth, or was Graham a racist and a xenophobe?

If a politician says Syria, Libya, North Korea, Venezuela, Haiti, and many African countries are down the toilet because of corruption, tyranny, poverty, starvation, lack of freedom, and lack of economic opportunity, it is the truth. 

Yet Trump did not go after the people of those countries; he went after the countries themselves, which are run by bad leaders.  When Trump goes after the North Korea's leader, Kim Jong-un, for destroying his country, he is not being racist toward Koreans.

Trump wasn't being racist even when he said the U.S. could bring in more Norwegians.  He had just met with Norway's leader, and this meeting is what accounts for his reference to Norway as an example of a place from where the U.S. could import more immigrants.  It was the media and other Democrats who brought up race. 

It really is about leaders, not entire peoples, and this isn't just some quirk of Trump's.  If people say Illinois and Chicago are "down the toilet," they are telling the truth, too.  But they are not saying the people of Illinois are down the toilet.  They are going after the politicians of both parties that have spent, borrowed, taxed, and promised Illinois into a disaster, and most of those politicians have been white. 

The entire dynamic of immigration is the result of bad leadership in countries whose living conditions have become intolerable.  When refugees seek legal status, when immigrants bring in family members under chain migration, and when people come in under the immigration lottery system, they are almost always seeking to leave countries and regimes that are oppressive, giving the people little economic opportunity and little freedom.  Are these people racists because they want to leave their backward countries, too?  The answer is obviously no, because their vote with their feet on what kind of countries they live in is not usually a statement against the people of those countries.  It's a rejection of the leadership and powers that be who have made life so miserable.  It's not racist.

Isn't it better to have a president who calls out Iran's leaders and supports Iran's people than a president who caves in to the leaders of Iran and fails to support Iran's people?

When someone like Graham jumps on the left's bandwagon and lectures Trump about his supposed racism, the facts just don't support his claims.  Thank goodness we have a president who wants to give the power and purse back to the people and put the heat where it belongs: on bad leaders.  If anyone needs a further example of Trump's understanding of the difference between people and leaders, the U.S. minorities whose unemployment has hit an all-time low is a good place to look.

The outrage over President Trump's supposed "s-hole" comment, which was about questioning whether the U.S. should be importing large numbers of nationals from dysfunctional countries, has drawn the hypocrites out of the woodwork.  One of the loudest out there harrumphing has been South Carolina's Sen. Lindsey Graham, who, much to the New York Times' glee, admonished Trump that "America is an idea, not a race."  Yet when Graham said in 2013, "The people coming across the southern border live in hellholes.  They don't like that.  They want to come here.  Our problem is, we can't have everybody in the world who lives in a hellhole come to America," was it the truth, or was Graham a racist and a xenophobe?

If a politician says Syria, Libya, North Korea, Venezuela, Haiti, and many African countries are down the toilet because of corruption, tyranny, poverty, starvation, lack of freedom, and lack of economic opportunity, it is the truth. 

Yet Trump did not go after the people of those countries; he went after the countries themselves, which are run by bad leaders.  When Trump goes after the North Korea's leader, Kim Jong-un, for destroying his country, he is not being racist toward Koreans.

Trump wasn't being racist even when he said the U.S. could bring in more Norwegians.  He had just met with Norway's leader, and this meeting is what accounts for his reference to Norway as an example of a place from where the U.S. could import more immigrants.  It was the media and other Democrats who brought up race. 

It really is about leaders, not entire peoples, and this isn't just some quirk of Trump's.  If people say Illinois and Chicago are "down the toilet," they are telling the truth, too.  But they are not saying the people of Illinois are down the toilet.  They are going after the politicians of both parties that have spent, borrowed, taxed, and promised Illinois into a disaster, and most of those politicians have been white. 

The entire dynamic of immigration is the result of bad leadership in countries whose living conditions have become intolerable.  When refugees seek legal status, when immigrants bring in family members under chain migration, and when people come in under the immigration lottery system, they are almost always seeking to leave countries and regimes that are oppressive, giving the people little economic opportunity and little freedom.  Are these people racists because they want to leave their backward countries, too?  The answer is obviously no, because their vote with their feet on what kind of countries they live in is not usually a statement against the people of those countries.  It's a rejection of the leadership and powers that be who have made life so miserable.  It's not racist.

Isn't it better to have a president who calls out Iran's leaders and supports Iran's people than a president who caves in to the leaders of Iran and fails to support Iran's people?

When someone like Graham jumps on the left's bandwagon and lectures Trump about his supposed racism, the facts just don't support his claims.  Thank goodness we have a president who wants to give the power and purse back to the people and put the heat where it belongs: on bad leaders.  If anyone needs a further example of Trump's understanding of the difference between people and leaders, the U.S. minorities whose unemployment has hit an all-time low is a good place to look.