Obama officials push back against Politico story about giving Hezb'allah a pass on criminal activities

Politico's bombshell report published yesterday alleging that the Obama administration ripped apart a government law enforcement program that was probing the terrorist group Hezb'allah's criminal networks around the world is being denied by former Obama officials.

The thrust of the three-part exposé is that the government had initiated a huge investigation into drug-running, arms-smuggling, human trafficking, and other criminal enterprises that Hezb'allah was profiting from around the world.  That probe was squashed by the White House in order to curry favor with Iran so that a deal on the Iranian nuclear program could be achieved.

The Obama administration believed cracking down on Hezbollah's trafficking would undermine nuclear negotiations. As David Asher, a former Pentagon illicit finance analyst and a key player in Operation Cassandra, told Meyer: "This was a policy decision, it was a systematic decision. They serially ripped apart this entire effort that was very well supported and resourced, and it was done from the top down."

The details are troubling. One example involves Ali Fayad, whom DEA agents suspected was the Hezbollah operative who reported directly to Russian president Vladimir Putin as a weapons supplier in Iraq and Syria. In 2014 Fayad was arrested by Czech authorities. Meyer reports that even though Fayad was indicted by U.S. courts for planning the murder of U.S. officials, "top Obama administration officials declined to apply serious pressure on the Czech government to extradite him to the United States, even as Putin was lobbying aggressively against it." 

The Obama-era officials went after the Politico reporter responsible for the story instead of addressing its salient facts.

Mediaite:

"These federal investigators were watching and gathering evidence of Hezbollah sort of transforming itself from a political power and a terrorist organization to one that was trafficking in drugs and other criminal conspiracies to make hundreds of millions of dollars," Meyers explained to Shannon Bream. "And the theory was... that were doing it to raise money to help rebuild after the Israel War and to help in expansion they were doing globally. So they gathered evidence, they designated about a couple dozen super facilitators as people that were connected to the conspiracy but when they really tried to delve deeply into these people, they got shot down."

Bream then asked Meyer to react to former Obama State Department spokeswoman (and now Fox News contributor) Marie Harf, who said the narrative in the Politico report was "false" and dismissed the anonymous sources as "low-level" and "ideological," as well as former National Security Counsel spokesman Tommy Vietor, who denied that the Obama administration was "soft" on Hezbollah and that the story was a "figment of the imagination."

Meyers pointed out a "theme" to these critiques, and while he said he was a "big fan" of Harf's, her assertion that his sources were "low-level" people was "sort of ridiculous."

"They were not ideologues. They are not flawed. I don't know what she's talking about," Meyer continued. "These were the people, one was a Pentagon person, one was a DEA person. But I also talked to many, many dozens of other people to get sort of ground truth and see what their allegations were held up to the light of day. So this is not a story in 14,000 words where I was just taking spin from some people."

The major media outlets who have bothered to report on this incredible story are taking their cues from the Obama officials.  Nothing to see here; move along.

What the Politico investigation shows is that the Iran nuclear deal was far more than an agreement to curb the Iranian nuclear program.  Ultimately, the deal ended up enabling Iran's proxy Hezb'allah to make a difference in the Syrian civil war and allowed the terrorist group to gain huge influence in Iraq by helping the government rid itself of ISIS.  Hezb'allah was able to do this because of hundreds of millions of dollars that poured into its coffers – profits from illegal enterprises, including the selling of drugs in the United States.

And the Obama administration could have severely restricted that criminal activity and greatly impacted the terrorist's profits.

Politico's bombshell report published yesterday alleging that the Obama administration ripped apart a government law enforcement program that was probing the terrorist group Hezb'allah's criminal networks around the world is being denied by former Obama officials.

The thrust of the three-part exposé is that the government had initiated a huge investigation into drug-running, arms-smuggling, human trafficking, and other criminal enterprises that Hezb'allah was profiting from around the world.  That probe was squashed by the White House in order to curry favor with Iran so that a deal on the Iranian nuclear program could be achieved.

The Obama administration believed cracking down on Hezbollah's trafficking would undermine nuclear negotiations. As David Asher, a former Pentagon illicit finance analyst and a key player in Operation Cassandra, told Meyer: "This was a policy decision, it was a systematic decision. They serially ripped apart this entire effort that was very well supported and resourced, and it was done from the top down."

The details are troubling. One example involves Ali Fayad, whom DEA agents suspected was the Hezbollah operative who reported directly to Russian president Vladimir Putin as a weapons supplier in Iraq and Syria. In 2014 Fayad was arrested by Czech authorities. Meyer reports that even though Fayad was indicted by U.S. courts for planning the murder of U.S. officials, "top Obama administration officials declined to apply serious pressure on the Czech government to extradite him to the United States, even as Putin was lobbying aggressively against it." 

The Obama-era officials went after the Politico reporter responsible for the story instead of addressing its salient facts.

Mediaite:

"These federal investigators were watching and gathering evidence of Hezbollah sort of transforming itself from a political power and a terrorist organization to one that was trafficking in drugs and other criminal conspiracies to make hundreds of millions of dollars," Meyers explained to Shannon Bream. "And the theory was... that were doing it to raise money to help rebuild after the Israel War and to help in expansion they were doing globally. So they gathered evidence, they designated about a couple dozen super facilitators as people that were connected to the conspiracy but when they really tried to delve deeply into these people, they got shot down."

Bream then asked Meyer to react to former Obama State Department spokeswoman (and now Fox News contributor) Marie Harf, who said the narrative in the Politico report was "false" and dismissed the anonymous sources as "low-level" and "ideological," as well as former National Security Counsel spokesman Tommy Vietor, who denied that the Obama administration was "soft" on Hezbollah and that the story was a "figment of the imagination."

Meyers pointed out a "theme" to these critiques, and while he said he was a "big fan" of Harf's, her assertion that his sources were "low-level" people was "sort of ridiculous."

"They were not ideologues. They are not flawed. I don't know what she's talking about," Meyer continued. "These were the people, one was a Pentagon person, one was a DEA person. But I also talked to many, many dozens of other people to get sort of ground truth and see what their allegations were held up to the light of day. So this is not a story in 14,000 words where I was just taking spin from some people."

The major media outlets who have bothered to report on this incredible story are taking their cues from the Obama officials.  Nothing to see here; move along.

What the Politico investigation shows is that the Iran nuclear deal was far more than an agreement to curb the Iranian nuclear program.  Ultimately, the deal ended up enabling Iran's proxy Hezb'allah to make a difference in the Syrian civil war and allowed the terrorist group to gain huge influence in Iraq by helping the government rid itself of ISIS.  Hezb'allah was able to do this because of hundreds of millions of dollars that poured into its coffers – profits from illegal enterprises, including the selling of drugs in the United States.

And the Obama administration could have severely restricted that criminal activity and greatly impacted the terrorist's profits.