New Austrian government teaching the EU how to handle 'refugee' migrants

The new Austrian government, elected in October and seated last week, has taken stern and effective measures to deal with the flood of purported "refugees" overwhelming many other E.U. members.  It is bearing out the worst fears of Islamophile liberals, such as those at the New York Times, who warned, taking only 51 words before using the other N-word:

A new coalition government was sworn in on Monday in Austria, and for the first time in more than 10 years it includes the far-right Freedom Party, a watershed for the populist movements that unsettled European politics this year.

The return to power of the Freedom Party, which was founded by neo-Nazis after World War II[.]

You might think death camps already have been established, but that is not at all the substance of the new government's policies.  Instead, the U.K. Express reports:

The Conservative People's Party (OVP) and the far-right Freedom Party (FPO) both ran their campaign on an anti-migrant policies. 

And the new government has quickly rolled out a series of migrant rules for those arriving in the country. 

Phones will be seized upon entry, allowing border officials to analyse mobile data to determine migrants' identities. 

This is common sense.  Many people falsely claim to be fleeing from the Syrian Civil War, but if their phone records indicate a lot of calls to, say, Egypt, Lebanon, or Morocco, they will not be accorded war refugee status.  Many disguise their true identities for various reasons, including ties to terrorist groups.

Money will also be taken from migrants and put towards the cost of caring for people arriving in the country. 

And benefits will be stopped for some migrants who have not yet "paid into" the country. 

The changes were outlined in a 180-page document written by the OVP and FPO. 

The partnership promised to do "much better" to combat issues regarding migration but said "nobody had anything to fear". 

On benefits, 31-year-old new Chancellor Sebastian Kurz said: "It will no longer happen for migrants who have never worked here a single day or paid anything into the social system to get thousands of euros in welfare." 


Chancellor Sebastian Kurz is the youngest head of government in Europe.

That makes enough sense that we ought to apply this policy in the U.S., where new legal immigrants (often elderly parents taking advantage of "chain immigration") can get benefits from Social Security trust funds that Americans have paid into their entire working lives.

Needless to say, Vienna saw its own version of the anti-Trump "resistance" as the new government was inaugurated.

Thousands of people took to the streets to protest the new government during the swearing-in ceremony in the capital of Austria. 

Police said 6,000 people gathered in Heroes Square, where they chanted "refugees welcome" and "no Nazi pigs".

Where was Rosie O'Donnell?

The two parties that formed the new government after running on a platform to manage the flood of "migrants" better won over 57.5% of the vote in the October election, so the Nazi-mongers are clearly in the minority.

Germans who wish Frau Merkel weren't quite so welcoming to "refugees" must be looking with envy on Austria.  I bet Germans will be watching closely to see how these measures work out.

The new Austrian government, elected in October and seated last week, has taken stern and effective measures to deal with the flood of purported "refugees" overwhelming many other E.U. members.  It is bearing out the worst fears of Islamophile liberals, such as those at the New York Times, who warned, taking only 51 words before using the other N-word:

A new coalition government was sworn in on Monday in Austria, and for the first time in more than 10 years it includes the far-right Freedom Party, a watershed for the populist movements that unsettled European politics this year.

The return to power of the Freedom Party, which was founded by neo-Nazis after World War II[.]

You might think death camps already have been established, but that is not at all the substance of the new government's policies.  Instead, the U.K. Express reports:

The Conservative People's Party (OVP) and the far-right Freedom Party (FPO) both ran their campaign on an anti-migrant policies. 

And the new government has quickly rolled out a series of migrant rules for those arriving in the country. 

Phones will be seized upon entry, allowing border officials to analyse mobile data to determine migrants' identities. 

This is common sense.  Many people falsely claim to be fleeing from the Syrian Civil War, but if their phone records indicate a lot of calls to, say, Egypt, Lebanon, or Morocco, they will not be accorded war refugee status.  Many disguise their true identities for various reasons, including ties to terrorist groups.

Money will also be taken from migrants and put towards the cost of caring for people arriving in the country. 

And benefits will be stopped for some migrants who have not yet "paid into" the country. 

The changes were outlined in a 180-page document written by the OVP and FPO. 

The partnership promised to do "much better" to combat issues regarding migration but said "nobody had anything to fear". 

On benefits, 31-year-old new Chancellor Sebastian Kurz said: "It will no longer happen for migrants who have never worked here a single day or paid anything into the social system to get thousands of euros in welfare." 


Chancellor Sebastian Kurz is the youngest head of government in Europe.

That makes enough sense that we ought to apply this policy in the U.S., where new legal immigrants (often elderly parents taking advantage of "chain immigration") can get benefits from Social Security trust funds that Americans have paid into their entire working lives.

Needless to say, Vienna saw its own version of the anti-Trump "resistance" as the new government was inaugurated.

Thousands of people took to the streets to protest the new government during the swearing-in ceremony in the capital of Austria. 

Police said 6,000 people gathered in Heroes Square, where they chanted "refugees welcome" and "no Nazi pigs".

Where was Rosie O'Donnell?

The two parties that formed the new government after running on a platform to manage the flood of "migrants" better won over 57.5% of the vote in the October election, so the Nazi-mongers are clearly in the minority.

Germans who wish Frau Merkel weren't quite so welcoming to "refugees" must be looking with envy on Austria.  I bet Germans will be watching closely to see how these measures work out.