Did the US follow Russia's lead on Jerusalem?

On May 14, 1948, President Harry S. Truman, over objections from secretary of state George C. Marshall, recognized the State of Israel.  The United States was the first country to extend de facto recognition.  Russia, however, was the first country to extend de jure recognition to the emergent Jewish State.  Washington did not extend de jure recognition for several months, and so it might be contended that Russia was the first country to extend unconditional recognition to the State of Israel.

Now, on the matter of recognizing Jerusalem as Israel's capital, it might be argued that Washington is again following Russia's lead.  

The following report appeared last April in the Times of Israel:

"We reaffirm our commitment to the UN-approved principles for a Palestinian-Israeli settlement, which include the status of East Jerusalem as the capital of the future Palestinian state. At the same time, we must state that in this context we view West Jerusalem as the capital of Israel," the Foreign Ministry in Moscow said in a statement.

Clearly, Russia recognizes the area of Jerusalem where Israel has its government offices as the capital of Israel.  Has anyone heard of threat of violence from Palestinians over Russia's action?  Did the New York Times rail, as it did in its December 6 editorial, anticipating President Trump's statement recognizing Jerusalem as capital of Israel – "[n]o Palestinian leader could accept such [action] and retain popular support"?  The editorial, after all, noted that East Jerusalem would not be the Palestinian capital.  Russia apparently recognizes East Jerusalem as Israel's capital.

Should the U.N. Security Council meet on the U.S. move, are we to expect that Russia would join other council members in chastising the U.S. – for following Russia's lead?

Omigosh – what if special counsel Robert Mueller cites President Trump's action as evidence of collusion with Putin?

On May 14, 1948, President Harry S. Truman, over objections from secretary of state George C. Marshall, recognized the State of Israel.  The United States was the first country to extend de facto recognition.  Russia, however, was the first country to extend de jure recognition to the emergent Jewish State.  Washington did not extend de jure recognition for several months, and so it might be contended that Russia was the first country to extend unconditional recognition to the State of Israel.

Now, on the matter of recognizing Jerusalem as Israel's capital, it might be argued that Washington is again following Russia's lead.  

The following report appeared last April in the Times of Israel:

"We reaffirm our commitment to the UN-approved principles for a Palestinian-Israeli settlement, which include the status of East Jerusalem as the capital of the future Palestinian state. At the same time, we must state that in this context we view West Jerusalem as the capital of Israel," the Foreign Ministry in Moscow said in a statement.

Clearly, Russia recognizes the area of Jerusalem where Israel has its government offices as the capital of Israel.  Has anyone heard of threat of violence from Palestinians over Russia's action?  Did the New York Times rail, as it did in its December 6 editorial, anticipating President Trump's statement recognizing Jerusalem as capital of Israel – "[n]o Palestinian leader could accept such [action] and retain popular support"?  The editorial, after all, noted that East Jerusalem would not be the Palestinian capital.  Russia apparently recognizes East Jerusalem as Israel's capital.

Should the U.N. Security Council meet on the U.S. move, are we to expect that Russia would join other council members in chastising the U.S. – for following Russia's lead?

Omigosh – what if special counsel Robert Mueller cites President Trump's action as evidence of collusion with Putin?