Most of Moore's accusers well above the age of consent

Of the three women involved in the Washington Post's bombshell accusations against Roy Moore, fourteen-year-old Leigh Corfman, was below Alabama's age of consent.  Two of the other three were seventeen, and one was eighteen.

The following Monday, Beverly Young-Nelson appeared at a press conference with attorney-activist Gloria Allred.  Nelson alleges that Moore groped her and tried to push her head into his crotch when she was sixteen and worked at one of Moore's favorite restaurants.

As the week unfolded, more women came forward to describe Moore's clumsy sexual advances.  Tina Johnson describes Moore awkwardly flirting with her and touching her butt when he worked as her attorney; Tina Johnson was a twenty-nine-year-old single mother at the time.

Gena Richardson claims that Roy Moore pestered her into going out with him, calling her until she agreed to go out with him.  Richardson also claims that he planted an unwanted kiss on her lips.  She was eighteen at the time.

Following these allegations, establishment conservatives – who already despised Moore – have called for Moore to step aside.  They seem to believe that if even some of the allegations are true, they ought to disqualify Moore.  Jonah Goldberg tweeted, "In 2017 it's controversial – AMONG CONSERVATIVES – for the GOP establishment to express disapproval for a guy who can't categorically deny he 'dated' teenagers."

Aside from the allegations made by Leigh Corfman and Beverly Young-Nelson, all the other allegations involve Roy Moore's failed efforts to woo women over the age of consent.  A thirty-two-year-old prosecutor attempting to date an eighteen-year-old high school student may not be your cup of tea, but it isn't a crime, and frankly, it shouldn't be a crime.

The charges made by Leigh Corfman and Beverly Young-Nelson are extremely serious and ethically disqualifying.  Morally decent men don't sexually assault waitresses or try to seduce fourteen-year-olds.  Lumping those allegations in with allegations of (arguably) odd or unsavory behavior contributes to an environment of feminist moral panic. 

Of the three women involved in the Washington Post's bombshell accusations against Roy Moore, fourteen-year-old Leigh Corfman, was below Alabama's age of consent.  Two of the other three were seventeen, and one was eighteen.

The following Monday, Beverly Young-Nelson appeared at a press conference with attorney-activist Gloria Allred.  Nelson alleges that Moore groped her and tried to push her head into his crotch when she was sixteen and worked at one of Moore's favorite restaurants.

As the week unfolded, more women came forward to describe Moore's clumsy sexual advances.  Tina Johnson describes Moore awkwardly flirting with her and touching her butt when he worked as her attorney; Tina Johnson was a twenty-nine-year-old single mother at the time.

Gena Richardson claims that Roy Moore pestered her into going out with him, calling her until she agreed to go out with him.  Richardson also claims that he planted an unwanted kiss on her lips.  She was eighteen at the time.

Following these allegations, establishment conservatives – who already despised Moore – have called for Moore to step aside.  They seem to believe that if even some of the allegations are true, they ought to disqualify Moore.  Jonah Goldberg tweeted, "In 2017 it's controversial – AMONG CONSERVATIVES – for the GOP establishment to express disapproval for a guy who can't categorically deny he 'dated' teenagers."

Aside from the allegations made by Leigh Corfman and Beverly Young-Nelson, all the other allegations involve Roy Moore's failed efforts to woo women over the age of consent.  A thirty-two-year-old prosecutor attempting to date an eighteen-year-old high school student may not be your cup of tea, but it isn't a crime, and frankly, it shouldn't be a crime.

The charges made by Leigh Corfman and Beverly Young-Nelson are extremely serious and ethically disqualifying.  Morally decent men don't sexually assault waitresses or try to seduce fourteen-year-olds.  Lumping those allegations in with allegations of (arguably) odd or unsavory behavior contributes to an environment of feminist moral panic.