Remember the Mayflower

We've had a lot of "bring down Columbus" and other symbols lately.

More than that, we just spent $500,000 to remove a Robert E. Lee statue in Dallas at the same time that the police pension is short of cash and the suburbs like Plano are getting all of the relocations from other states.

History is ugly, but it is also beautiful.  The Mayflower is one of those beautiful chapters.

This week, we remember one of the most important dates in the history of the New World, the future U.S., and religious freedom.

I'm especially fond of the story because my Uncle Joaquin, my father's uncle and a successful judge, attorney, and law professor in pre-Castro Cuba, used to share it with us when were kids.  He felt that it was one of the most significant moments in world history, or the day that a group of people decided to go west and find religious freedom.

It started when a group of people boarded the Mayflower in 1620:

In a difficult Atlantic crossing, the 90-foot Mayflower encountered rough seas and storms and was blown more than 500 miles off course. 

Along the way, the settlers formulated and signed the Mayflower Compact, an agreement that bound the signatories into a "civil body politic." Because it established constitutional law and the rule of the majority, the compact is regarded as an important precursor to American democracy. 

After a 66-day voyage, the ship landed on November 21 on the tip of Cape Cod at what is now Provincetown, Massachusetts.

It is such a beautiful story, especially when one remembers that half the colonists died of disease, but the group persevered and eventually celebrated what we now call "Thanksgiving."

Unfortunately, the idiots bringing down Columbus probably remember the story differently – a confirmation of their ignorance, not the validity of the story.

They'd probably say these "white people" raped the land and brought disease.  Indeed, some did.  They also brought the freedom that allows these clowns to take votes in city government or express themselves without the King, Montezuma, or Geronimo hanging them for treason.

Long live the Mayflower.  God save the U.S. from these fools who want to rewrite history rather than talk about the lousy state of our Democrat-run inner cities or the public schools that Democrats like the Obamas do not send their kids to.

PS: You can listen to my show (Canto Talk) and follow me on Twitter.

We've had a lot of "bring down Columbus" and other symbols lately.

More than that, we just spent $500,000 to remove a Robert E. Lee statue in Dallas at the same time that the police pension is short of cash and the suburbs like Plano are getting all of the relocations from other states.

History is ugly, but it is also beautiful.  The Mayflower is one of those beautiful chapters.

This week, we remember one of the most important dates in the history of the New World, the future U.S., and religious freedom.

I'm especially fond of the story because my Uncle Joaquin, my father's uncle and a successful judge, attorney, and law professor in pre-Castro Cuba, used to share it with us when were kids.  He felt that it was one of the most significant moments in world history, or the day that a group of people decided to go west and find religious freedom.

It started when a group of people boarded the Mayflower in 1620:

In a difficult Atlantic crossing, the 90-foot Mayflower encountered rough seas and storms and was blown more than 500 miles off course. 

Along the way, the settlers formulated and signed the Mayflower Compact, an agreement that bound the signatories into a "civil body politic." Because it established constitutional law and the rule of the majority, the compact is regarded as an important precursor to American democracy. 

After a 66-day voyage, the ship landed on November 21 on the tip of Cape Cod at what is now Provincetown, Massachusetts.

It is such a beautiful story, especially when one remembers that half the colonists died of disease, but the group persevered and eventually celebrated what we now call "Thanksgiving."

Unfortunately, the idiots bringing down Columbus probably remember the story differently – a confirmation of their ignorance, not the validity of the story.

They'd probably say these "white people" raped the land and brought disease.  Indeed, some did.  They also brought the freedom that allows these clowns to take votes in city government or express themselves without the King, Montezuma, or Geronimo hanging them for treason.

Long live the Mayflower.  God save the U.S. from these fools who want to rewrite history rather than talk about the lousy state of our Democrat-run inner cities or the public schools that Democrats like the Obamas do not send their kids to.

PS: You can listen to my show (Canto Talk) and follow me on Twitter.