Houston proves it: The race-hustlers are wrong about the US

Yesterday, I saw an article by Jonah Goldberg.  He related a story about two men helping each other.  It indeed confirmed that Houston revealed the best of America, and he is so right:

And yet, I couldn't help but notice that there is a "feel good" aspect to the whole catastrophe. 

The best example is the hyper-viral story of two men loading up their boat and driving into the storm. 

CNN's Ed Lavandera found them under a highway overpass readying the vessel.

"You guys just jumping in to help out?" Lavandera asked.

"Yes, sir," says one of the men.

"What are you going to do?" Lavandera asks him.

"Go try to save some lives."

That man was African-American. His partner appeared to be Caucasian or maybe Latino. 

But it doesn't matter at all. 

We don't know if they're Republican or Democrat, pro-Trump or anti-Trump, NRA members or fans of gun control. (Though let's be honest: This is Texas, so we can guess on that one.) All they wanted to do was help. 

While it was a journalistic faux pas not to get the men's names, it almost made the story more endearing that we didn't get them, because it reinforced the idea that they were just normal Americans.

My brother lives in South Houston, and he told me about the volunteers, the people going door to door checking on their neighbors.

On top of that, you may have noticed Houston has an black mayor, a Hispanic police chief, a Hispanic fire chief, and several other minorities in positions of leadership.  These three men, and Governor Abbott and President Trump, are all working together to make things happen.

Of course, this is not the U.S. the race-hustlers want you to think of.  They want you to believe that everyone is at each other's throat and nothing gets done.

That's not what we see in Houston.  We see people working together for the common good.

The race-hustlers are hurting the country and not helping the Democrats between the coasts.

PS: You can listen to my show (Canto Talk) and follow me on Twitter.

Yesterday, I saw an article by Jonah Goldberg.  He related a story about two men helping each other.  It indeed confirmed that Houston revealed the best of America, and he is so right:

And yet, I couldn't help but notice that there is a "feel good" aspect to the whole catastrophe. 

The best example is the hyper-viral story of two men loading up their boat and driving into the storm. 

CNN's Ed Lavandera found them under a highway overpass readying the vessel.

"You guys just jumping in to help out?" Lavandera asked.

"Yes, sir," says one of the men.

"What are you going to do?" Lavandera asks him.

"Go try to save some lives."

That man was African-American. His partner appeared to be Caucasian or maybe Latino. 

But it doesn't matter at all. 

We don't know if they're Republican or Democrat, pro-Trump or anti-Trump, NRA members or fans of gun control. (Though let's be honest: This is Texas, so we can guess on that one.) All they wanted to do was help. 

While it was a journalistic faux pas not to get the men's names, it almost made the story more endearing that we didn't get them, because it reinforced the idea that they were just normal Americans.

My brother lives in South Houston, and he told me about the volunteers, the people going door to door checking on their neighbors.

On top of that, you may have noticed Houston has an black mayor, a Hispanic police chief, a Hispanic fire chief, and several other minorities in positions of leadership.  These three men, and Governor Abbott and President Trump, are all working together to make things happen.

Of course, this is not the U.S. the race-hustlers want you to think of.  They want you to believe that everyone is at each other's throat and nothing gets done.

That's not what we see in Houston.  We see people working together for the common good.

The race-hustlers are hurting the country and not helping the Democrats between the coasts.

PS: You can listen to my show (Canto Talk) and follow me on Twitter.