The Trump Hate Campaign

The #NeverTrump set has morphed into the Surveillance for All set.  Consider this comment, here directed at Jared Kushner, from Hate Trump-monger Jennifer Rubin.

The danger for Kushner – aside from embarrassment – is that he could be contradicted by one or more witnesses or by electronic surveillance.

Will there be howls at Rubin's suggestion that there might be surveillance tapes on Kusher?  Weren't there howls when President Trump allowed that there might be tapes of his conversation with James Comey?

Does "The Rule of Law" apply to the Trump administration or something else – say, "arbitrary and capricious" attack, to continue until the target is neutralized?

The viciousness of the Trump Hate Campaign is breathtaking.  And by its viciousness, one point is obvious: there is no fear of Donald J. Trump among his assailants.  And why should there be, considering their vast numbers in the media?  To those filled with a hate born solely out of ambitious greed, quick to demagogue President Trump as a brutal dictator, one asks: if you were in North Korea, Iran, or Cuba, how long could you get away with printing your diatribes, speaking your venom against the leaders in these countries?

Indeed, how can the Trump Hate Crowd fear a president they are confident they can hamstring until, at their time of choosing, the political coup de grâce will be applied?

Does anyone doubt that the New York Times has already prepared the title for the editorial on terminating the Trump presidency?  Perhaps it reads: "Now, Finally, He Must Go!"

What will prompt the demand?  Dismissing Grand Inquisitor Robert Mueller?  Daring to work with Russia on terrorism?  Why not even this – moving the U.S. embassy in Israel to Jerusalem?  The specific event is unimportant; for the Trump Hate Crowd, the man is simply guilty of serving as U.S. president.

The hostile, hysterical Trump Hate letters that regularly appear in The New York Times tend to be devoid of specific charges.  Their unique sameness suggests that the editors hope that the future will conclude, based on  "the evidence," that there was scant support for Donald J. Trump as president; consequently, his election had to be the result of nefarious collusion with a foreign influence, as his enemies charge.

The anti-Trump hysteria, regularly printed in the Times, adds up to the invidious charge that Trump and his voters reject their proper place in the American political system.  Their place?  To shut up and accept the messes made by the rich and careless, personified by F. Scott Fitzgerald in The Great Gatsby as Tom and Daisy Buchanan: "They were careless people, Tom and Daisy – they smashed up things and creatures and then retreated back into their money or their vast carelessness, or whatever it was that kept them together and let other people clean up the mess they had made[.]"  

The #NeverTrump set has morphed into the Surveillance for All set.  Consider this comment, here directed at Jared Kushner, from Hate Trump-monger Jennifer Rubin.

The danger for Kushner – aside from embarrassment – is that he could be contradicted by one or more witnesses or by electronic surveillance.

Will there be howls at Rubin's suggestion that there might be surveillance tapes on Kusher?  Weren't there howls when President Trump allowed that there might be tapes of his conversation with James Comey?

Does "The Rule of Law" apply to the Trump administration or something else – say, "arbitrary and capricious" attack, to continue until the target is neutralized?

The viciousness of the Trump Hate Campaign is breathtaking.  And by its viciousness, one point is obvious: there is no fear of Donald J. Trump among his assailants.  And why should there be, considering their vast numbers in the media?  To those filled with a hate born solely out of ambitious greed, quick to demagogue President Trump as a brutal dictator, one asks: if you were in North Korea, Iran, or Cuba, how long could you get away with printing your diatribes, speaking your venom against the leaders in these countries?

Indeed, how can the Trump Hate Crowd fear a president they are confident they can hamstring until, at their time of choosing, the political coup de grâce will be applied?

Does anyone doubt that the New York Times has already prepared the title for the editorial on terminating the Trump presidency?  Perhaps it reads: "Now, Finally, He Must Go!"

What will prompt the demand?  Dismissing Grand Inquisitor Robert Mueller?  Daring to work with Russia on terrorism?  Why not even this – moving the U.S. embassy in Israel to Jerusalem?  The specific event is unimportant; for the Trump Hate Crowd, the man is simply guilty of serving as U.S. president.

The hostile, hysterical Trump Hate letters that regularly appear in The New York Times tend to be devoid of specific charges.  Their unique sameness suggests that the editors hope that the future will conclude, based on  "the evidence," that there was scant support for Donald J. Trump as president; consequently, his election had to be the result of nefarious collusion with a foreign influence, as his enemies charge.

The anti-Trump hysteria, regularly printed in the Times, adds up to the invidious charge that Trump and his voters reject their proper place in the American political system.  Their place?  To shut up and accept the messes made by the rich and careless, personified by F. Scott Fitzgerald in The Great Gatsby as Tom and Daisy Buchanan: "They were careless people, Tom and Daisy – they smashed up things and creatures and then retreated back into their money or their vast carelessness, or whatever it was that kept them together and let other people clean up the mess they had made[.]"