Journalist sanctioned for covering 'gay pride' anti-Semitism speaks out

A few days ago, Thomas Lifson reported on the bigoted case of a journalist for a Chicago newspaper aimed at homosexuals who was transferred from her reporting job to one behind the scenes because she dared to write about the plight of three Jewish lesbians forcibly expelled from a "Dyke March" because their "pride" multicolored flag sported a prominent Jewish star.

The Algemeiner Journal, a newspaper on Jewish news based in New York, picked up on the story.  The reporter, Gretchen Rachel Hammond, a man who calls himself a woman, spoke at the Algemeiner's Summer Benefit in New York on Thursday, mentioning his personal background plus insights on the implications of the whole incident.

I found the landscape in which our silos were placed was vast and beautiful but also capable of great ugliness in no small part because, as Laverne Cox once reminded us, "hurt people hurt people." Two weeks ago, I ran afoul of that ugliness by reporting on a growing cancer from within the community. Instead of sticking to the narrative that all our issues were the result of far right-wing attackers, I simply wrote about a scene which demonstrated that we are pretty good at causing problems for ourselves.

Any song of freedom has to be belted out with a clear voice. The jarring, discordant racket of voices wailing notes like intersectionality, privilege, systems of oppression, safe spaces and pink-washing may have sounded perfectly logical coming out of the mouth of some semi-stoned professor at CUNY or UIC but when, put into practice, basically had us tearing into each other like shoppers at a Walmart Thanksgiving Day Sale and mud wrestling competition.

The rest of the world shook their heads, some in astonishment, some with a smug, "What did we tell you?," while the voices of three Jewish girls who went to a Pride march were silenced and then the reporter who told their story. ...

They say our profession is dying. They say that we are obsolete or fake. But as long as we can see our communities, as long as we are brave enough to amplify their voices and as long as we make sure we never lose our own, our stories will not be silenced.

Thank you for making sure mine never was.

Hammond's story, his voice was not suppressed because a Jewish newspaper in New York and a conservative site, Breitbart, reported that a half-Indian (from India) man calling himself a woman was punished for penning an article that doesn't fit the narrative his bosses desired.

This was another victory in exposing how the left deals with those who don't adhere to the proper left narrative.  It was another victory for real news, not the fake stuff that passes for news in most media.

A few days ago, Thomas Lifson reported on the bigoted case of a journalist for a Chicago newspaper aimed at homosexuals who was transferred from her reporting job to one behind the scenes because she dared to write about the plight of three Jewish lesbians forcibly expelled from a "Dyke March" because their "pride" multicolored flag sported a prominent Jewish star.

The Algemeiner Journal, a newspaper on Jewish news based in New York, picked up on the story.  The reporter, Gretchen Rachel Hammond, a man who calls himself a woman, spoke at the Algemeiner's Summer Benefit in New York on Thursday, mentioning his personal background plus insights on the implications of the whole incident.

I found the landscape in which our silos were placed was vast and beautiful but also capable of great ugliness in no small part because, as Laverne Cox once reminded us, "hurt people hurt people." Two weeks ago, I ran afoul of that ugliness by reporting on a growing cancer from within the community. Instead of sticking to the narrative that all our issues were the result of far right-wing attackers, I simply wrote about a scene which demonstrated that we are pretty good at causing problems for ourselves.

Any song of freedom has to be belted out with a clear voice. The jarring, discordant racket of voices wailing notes like intersectionality, privilege, systems of oppression, safe spaces and pink-washing may have sounded perfectly logical coming out of the mouth of some semi-stoned professor at CUNY or UIC but when, put into practice, basically had us tearing into each other like shoppers at a Walmart Thanksgiving Day Sale and mud wrestling competition.

The rest of the world shook their heads, some in astonishment, some with a smug, "What did we tell you?," while the voices of three Jewish girls who went to a Pride march were silenced and then the reporter who told their story. ...

They say our profession is dying. They say that we are obsolete or fake. But as long as we can see our communities, as long as we are brave enough to amplify their voices and as long as we make sure we never lose our own, our stories will not be silenced.

Thank you for making sure mine never was.

Hammond's story, his voice was not suppressed because a Jewish newspaper in New York and a conservative site, Breitbart, reported that a half-Indian (from India) man calling himself a woman was punished for penning an article that doesn't fit the narrative his bosses desired.

This was another victory in exposing how the left deals with those who don't adhere to the proper left narrative.  It was another victory for real news, not the fake stuff that passes for news in most media.