A tale of two Trumps

Donald Trump traveled to Youngstown, Ohio for what became a victory speech.  Tuesday's vote to proceed with debate in the Senate by 51-50 (with V.P. Pence casting the deciding vote) on health care reform was a major win despite its limited meaning regarding passing legislation.  Procedural votes have been a way for the swamp people to kill legislation without their names being associated with the effort.  Trump railed against this political maneuver earlier this week.  This was Trump at his best.

Meanwhile, the other Trump spent much effort attacking his own attorney general, Jeff Sessions, since Sessions has recused himself from the Russian and campaign investigations.  Trump's family and friends now must suffer the investigation of Robert Mueller and his democratic lawyer team.  This bogs down his White House and threatens his administration.  All this angst occurs despite any visible evidence of any collusion or illegality, which should be the basis of any special counsel appointment.

The irony of this situation is surprising to those who do not understand Trump.  Sessions is a tough political character who was rejected for a position years ago by Democrats and decided to pursue the Senate.  He was the first senator to endorse Trump.  He should have warned Trump that he would have to recuse himself.  Yet Trump has forgotten that he chose to fire James Comey when he should have waited until the Russian accusations were proven false.  The quick action by Trump forced Deputy A.G. Rod Rosenstein (who supplied the rationale) to appoint an independent counsel to insulate himself from criticism in Washington.

The swamp is wide and deep.  The snakes in the private sector are prey to the alligators of the public-sector swamp.  Mueller should recuse himself, as he has a personal rapport with Comey and was interviewed for the FBI directorship position while accepting the special counsel job.

Yet ethics do not always run both ways.  In the House, the ethics issues for intelligence chair Devin Nunes are more difficult than for ranking member Adam Schiff, despite leaks from Schiff.  Hillary Clinton escapes scrutiny for actions during her tenure as secretary of state and for her campaign, while Trump takes incoming daily.  This fuels Trump's anger with Sessions.

With the revelations that Democrat I.T. provider Imran Awan for former DNC chair Debbie Wasserman Schultz was arrested at Dulles airport, the narrative may change.  Accusations of bank fraud may be the tip of the iceberg.  This allows the Trump administration to go on the offensive.  Could the DNC email leaks have anything to do with this I.T. provider?  Will Sessions or his staff seize upon this information?

The change in White House messaging by hiring Anthony Scaramucci is evident by Trump hitting the road.  This is his best way to get the message out.  He needs to tell his story regarding repeal and replacement of Obamacare.  He needs to also tell the public regularly about tax reform and reduction to spur the economy.  This is his ticket to re-election and retention of the Congress by Republicans.  Framing repeal and replacement of failed Obamacare as necessary to give regular people a choice is a winning strategy.  These victories will make the Russian investigations unimportant.  After all, Trump has committed no crime.  Victories for Americans will neutralize the "resist Trump" movement.

Jeff Sessions is beloved by many conservatives.  Further, he is the most effective Cabinet member pursuing the Trump agenda.  Embarrassing the A.G. in public is poor form.  The deputy A.G. has let Trump down, too.  But Trump has not accepted the limitations of the public sector.  Personalities sometimes must be quieted.  Perhaps Trump will control himself long enough to get his legislative victories.  Which Trump will emerge? 

The Republicans have not supported their president.  They lack resolve and integrity to keep their promises.  Senators Collins and Murkowski have demonstrated less concern with our health than with their own political health.  Pressure must be brought to bear on them.  Compromises will be needed to garner the necessary votes for legislation.  Will Majority Leader McConnell be able to manage his caucus?  The future is uncertain, but a resolute Trump less worried by investigators will be more focused.  Tuesday was a day to begin the consolidation of Republican legislative efforts and recharge Donald Trump on the road.

Donald Trump traveled to Youngstown, Ohio for what became a victory speech.  Tuesday's vote to proceed with debate in the Senate by 51-50 (with V.P. Pence casting the deciding vote) on health care reform was a major win despite its limited meaning regarding passing legislation.  Procedural votes have been a way for the swamp people to kill legislation without their names being associated with the effort.  Trump railed against this political maneuver earlier this week.  This was Trump at his best.

Meanwhile, the other Trump spent much effort attacking his own attorney general, Jeff Sessions, since Sessions has recused himself from the Russian and campaign investigations.  Trump's family and friends now must suffer the investigation of Robert Mueller and his democratic lawyer team.  This bogs down his White House and threatens his administration.  All this angst occurs despite any visible evidence of any collusion or illegality, which should be the basis of any special counsel appointment.

The irony of this situation is surprising to those who do not understand Trump.  Sessions is a tough political character who was rejected for a position years ago by Democrats and decided to pursue the Senate.  He was the first senator to endorse Trump.  He should have warned Trump that he would have to recuse himself.  Yet Trump has forgotten that he chose to fire James Comey when he should have waited until the Russian accusations were proven false.  The quick action by Trump forced Deputy A.G. Rod Rosenstein (who supplied the rationale) to appoint an independent counsel to insulate himself from criticism in Washington.

The swamp is wide and deep.  The snakes in the private sector are prey to the alligators of the public-sector swamp.  Mueller should recuse himself, as he has a personal rapport with Comey and was interviewed for the FBI directorship position while accepting the special counsel job.

Yet ethics do not always run both ways.  In the House, the ethics issues for intelligence chair Devin Nunes are more difficult than for ranking member Adam Schiff, despite leaks from Schiff.  Hillary Clinton escapes scrutiny for actions during her tenure as secretary of state and for her campaign, while Trump takes incoming daily.  This fuels Trump's anger with Sessions.

With the revelations that Democrat I.T. provider Imran Awan for former DNC chair Debbie Wasserman Schultz was arrested at Dulles airport, the narrative may change.  Accusations of bank fraud may be the tip of the iceberg.  This allows the Trump administration to go on the offensive.  Could the DNC email leaks have anything to do with this I.T. provider?  Will Sessions or his staff seize upon this information?

The change in White House messaging by hiring Anthony Scaramucci is evident by Trump hitting the road.  This is his best way to get the message out.  He needs to tell his story regarding repeal and replacement of Obamacare.  He needs to also tell the public regularly about tax reform and reduction to spur the economy.  This is his ticket to re-election and retention of the Congress by Republicans.  Framing repeal and replacement of failed Obamacare as necessary to give regular people a choice is a winning strategy.  These victories will make the Russian investigations unimportant.  After all, Trump has committed no crime.  Victories for Americans will neutralize the "resist Trump" movement.

Jeff Sessions is beloved by many conservatives.  Further, he is the most effective Cabinet member pursuing the Trump agenda.  Embarrassing the A.G. in public is poor form.  The deputy A.G. has let Trump down, too.  But Trump has not accepted the limitations of the public sector.  Personalities sometimes must be quieted.  Perhaps Trump will control himself long enough to get his legislative victories.  Which Trump will emerge? 

The Republicans have not supported their president.  They lack resolve and integrity to keep their promises.  Senators Collins and Murkowski have demonstrated less concern with our health than with their own political health.  Pressure must be brought to bear on them.  Compromises will be needed to garner the necessary votes for legislation.  Will Majority Leader McConnell be able to manage his caucus?  The future is uncertain, but a resolute Trump less worried by investigators will be more focused.  Tuesday was a day to begin the consolidation of Republican legislative efforts and recharge Donald Trump on the road.