Modeling assassination is more dangerous than verbal endorsement of violence

The infamous production of "Julius Caesar" that depicts the assassination of President Trump has been repeatedly defended, especially after the shooting of congressional Republicans, as not endorsing violence.  The actor Corey Stoll, who played Brutus, wrote he did not believe that anyone would view the play as an "endorsement of violence" against the president.  Whether or not the play intended an endorsement of violence, it enacted the graphic assassination of a sitting president, which is much more dangerous.  Not the famous speeches, but that sanguinary assault is what got the hateful crowd howling.

One of the strongest findings psychology has ever established is the tendency of people to imitate observed aggression, especially when the violence is observed to be socially reinforced.  Albert Bandura is considered one of the most influential, if not the most influential living American psychologist.  He founded an entire field of psychology, which he called social learning theory, by mapping out human motivation, thought, and action in the observational learning and imitation of aggression.  Bandura's social learning theory moved American psychology beyond radical behaviorism and provided the scientific basis of cognitive behavior therapy, which is the most widely used form of therapy today.  Bandura called observational learning "modeling," from which the term "role model" derives.  Modeling theory established that imitation is a primary, neurologically based learning process, especially in learning aggression.

In parallel to Professor Bandura, Madonna is considered one of the most influential, if not the most influential, living American magical slut.  She too founded an entire field, one for performers who can't sing, can't act, move clumsily, and have an innate coarseness no costuming can disguise.  But her inspirational soliloquy for women and children about "blowing up the White House" cannot be modeled by violent, left-wing fascists, as can the enactment of presidential assassination, which CNN's parent company paid for and CNN's pundit Fareed Zakaria extolled.

Corey Stoll also wrote a glowing tribute to his fellow cast members for their resolute bravery.  It seems they continued reciting lines while heavily guarded 'til payday despite "right-wing" protests.  He warbled, "[W]atching my castmates hold their performances together, it occurred to me this is the resistance."  Which resistance?  The resistance of millions of patriots who would sacrifice their lives to preserve the United States as a bordered constitutional republic or the Hollywood-Manhattan bougie-boutique resistance with the updated Che Guevara beret in black or red?  Corey Stoll's drama-queen resisters use other men's real blood to preserve their freedom while praising themselves for reveling in the fake blood of a president.

The real resistance arose because tens of millions of patriots recognized that Barack Obama was trying to destroy America (though, happily, he destroyed only the Democratic Party) and that Hillary would finish the job.

Stoll wrote that he had "little fear of offending people" of the real resistance.  How could he?  He doesn't know they exist.  He can't understand that they love America not because she is perfect, but because she is God's gift to them, and Donald Trump's election brings hope for the preservation of that gift.  Watching the depiction of Trump's assassination is to the people of the great resistance like watching the assassination of any leader who came forward at a pivotal moment in history, whether Franklin Roosevelt, John Kennedy, Martin Luther King, or Ronald Reagan.  The psychodynamics of spoiled-rotten celebrities do not admit respect for the patriotic resistance or gratitude for real sacrifice, lest their worshipful mirrors reflect truth and cause them to die of shame.

Poor Cory boo-hooed that he had become "exhausted and nervous" by the hecklers and people who interrupted the assassination scene.  May the name of every performer and producer involved in that play be remembered, and, without modeling their murder, may they be kept exhausted and nervous as long as possible.

The infamous production of "Julius Caesar" that depicts the assassination of President Trump has been repeatedly defended, especially after the shooting of congressional Republicans, as not endorsing violence.  The actor Corey Stoll, who played Brutus, wrote he did not believe that anyone would view the play as an "endorsement of violence" against the president.  Whether or not the play intended an endorsement of violence, it enacted the graphic assassination of a sitting president, which is much more dangerous.  Not the famous speeches, but that sanguinary assault is what got the hateful crowd howling.

One of the strongest findings psychology has ever established is the tendency of people to imitate observed aggression, especially when the violence is observed to be socially reinforced.  Albert Bandura is considered one of the most influential, if not the most influential living American psychologist.  He founded an entire field of psychology, which he called social learning theory, by mapping out human motivation, thought, and action in the observational learning and imitation of aggression.  Bandura's social learning theory moved American psychology beyond radical behaviorism and provided the scientific basis of cognitive behavior therapy, which is the most widely used form of therapy today.  Bandura called observational learning "modeling," from which the term "role model" derives.  Modeling theory established that imitation is a primary, neurologically based learning process, especially in learning aggression.

In parallel to Professor Bandura, Madonna is considered one of the most influential, if not the most influential, living American magical slut.  She too founded an entire field, one for performers who can't sing, can't act, move clumsily, and have an innate coarseness no costuming can disguise.  But her inspirational soliloquy for women and children about "blowing up the White House" cannot be modeled by violent, left-wing fascists, as can the enactment of presidential assassination, which CNN's parent company paid for and CNN's pundit Fareed Zakaria extolled.

Corey Stoll also wrote a glowing tribute to his fellow cast members for their resolute bravery.  It seems they continued reciting lines while heavily guarded 'til payday despite "right-wing" protests.  He warbled, "[W]atching my castmates hold their performances together, it occurred to me this is the resistance."  Which resistance?  The resistance of millions of patriots who would sacrifice their lives to preserve the United States as a bordered constitutional republic or the Hollywood-Manhattan bougie-boutique resistance with the updated Che Guevara beret in black or red?  Corey Stoll's drama-queen resisters use other men's real blood to preserve their freedom while praising themselves for reveling in the fake blood of a president.

The real resistance arose because tens of millions of patriots recognized that Barack Obama was trying to destroy America (though, happily, he destroyed only the Democratic Party) and that Hillary would finish the job.

Stoll wrote that he had "little fear of offending people" of the real resistance.  How could he?  He doesn't know they exist.  He can't understand that they love America not because she is perfect, but because she is God's gift to them, and Donald Trump's election brings hope for the preservation of that gift.  Watching the depiction of Trump's assassination is to the people of the great resistance like watching the assassination of any leader who came forward at a pivotal moment in history, whether Franklin Roosevelt, John Kennedy, Martin Luther King, or Ronald Reagan.  The psychodynamics of spoiled-rotten celebrities do not admit respect for the patriotic resistance or gratitude for real sacrifice, lest their worshipful mirrors reflect truth and cause them to die of shame.

Poor Cory boo-hooed that he had become "exhausted and nervous" by the hecklers and people who interrupted the assassination scene.  May the name of every performer and producer involved in that play be remembered, and, without modeling their murder, may they be kept exhausted and nervous as long as possible.