So how does Janet Napolitano do it?

One must wonder.  How does Janet Napolitano do it?  How does she continually wind up in places of power, despite her consistent reputation for ineptitude and corruption?

While she was governor of Arizona, Napolitano requested increased federal border security for her state, a praiseworthy action.  But later, while the head of Homeland Security, she actually opposed the same request made by her successor, Arizona governor Jan Brewer, even though Brewer's request was essentially identical to Napolitano's.  Hypocrisy knows no bounds.

In an extraordinary disconnect from practicality, Napolitano once proposed that the solution to airline hijacking was to require all passengers to keep their hands on their laps throughout the flight.  There is more.  After a terrorist attempted to firebomb an aircraft during landing, a passenger saved the day by overpowering the would-be mass murderer.  In response to this failure to prevent the terrorist from boarding the flight, Napolitano said (with amazing audacity) that "the system worked."  Apparently, the secret system involved having a large Dutch passenger on board to wrestle the bomber (sarcasm, of course).

The saga continues.  Now, Napolitano has somehow become head of the University of California, and apparently has not changed a bit.  She is accused of hiding $175 million in taxpayer funds from the public.  While she justifies this as an emergency fund, or what is often known as a slush fund, she cites among her list of emergencies funding for illegal immigrants.

Slush funds, although improper, are often a means of overriding bureaucratic foot-dragging when an immediate and legitimate need exists.  The practice, while frowned upon, at least oftentimes serves the taxpayer.  However, Napolitano's case is quite different in important respects.  According to a news article at Fox, Napolitano was dodging accountability for the funds with which she had been entrusted, trying to conceal her deeds from auditors, and requesting even more tuition money her department did not need.  All the while, she was overpaying her staff.

Who does Napolitano think she is – a Clinton?

One must wonder.  How does Janet Napolitano do it?  How does she continually wind up in places of power, despite her consistent reputation for ineptitude and corruption?

While she was governor of Arizona, Napolitano requested increased federal border security for her state, a praiseworthy action.  But later, while the head of Homeland Security, she actually opposed the same request made by her successor, Arizona governor Jan Brewer, even though Brewer's request was essentially identical to Napolitano's.  Hypocrisy knows no bounds.

In an extraordinary disconnect from practicality, Napolitano once proposed that the solution to airline hijacking was to require all passengers to keep their hands on their laps throughout the flight.  There is more.  After a terrorist attempted to firebomb an aircraft during landing, a passenger saved the day by overpowering the would-be mass murderer.  In response to this failure to prevent the terrorist from boarding the flight, Napolitano said (with amazing audacity) that "the system worked."  Apparently, the secret system involved having a large Dutch passenger on board to wrestle the bomber (sarcasm, of course).

The saga continues.  Now, Napolitano has somehow become head of the University of California, and apparently has not changed a bit.  She is accused of hiding $175 million in taxpayer funds from the public.  While she justifies this as an emergency fund, or what is often known as a slush fund, she cites among her list of emergencies funding for illegal immigrants.

Slush funds, although improper, are often a means of overriding bureaucratic foot-dragging when an immediate and legitimate need exists.  The practice, while frowned upon, at least oftentimes serves the taxpayer.  However, Napolitano's case is quite different in important respects.  According to a news article at Fox, Napolitano was dodging accountability for the funds with which she had been entrusted, trying to conceal her deeds from auditors, and requesting even more tuition money her department did not need.  All the while, she was overpaying her staff.

Who does Napolitano think she is – a Clinton?