Will the anti-Trump right unite behind the administration to confirm Gorsuch?

With the nomination of Neil Gorsuch for the position of associate justice of the Supreme Court, taking the seat of former Justice Scalia, President Trump has kept another promise made during his campaign.  Before discussing the merits of this nomination, it is time for his conservative opponents to recognize that Donald Trump has swiftly changed the direction of the nation toward a more constitutional, citizen-oriented federal government.

The new administration does need to learn from this week’s errors in implementation regarding the vetting of refugees from questionable nations; there is little doubt that they will develop improved methodology that will reduce confusion.  However, there can be no doubt that the Democrats have abandoned any possibility of a honeymoon period for the new president.  They have determined that their future resides in a strong liberal opposition to traditional federalism.  Slow-walking cabinet nominees is but one such technique.

Democrats will continue to raise funds through the Soros approach, applying anarchy through extreme groups marching against most policies the Trump administration will support.  They will utilize group identity politics supporting minorities, feminists, abortion advocates, the poor, and disadvantaged persons.  Can any conservative still argue that they should not coalesce behind Donald Trump on most issues?  Will these conservatives watch from the sidelines while progressives hinder conservative policies?

Why is this necessary?  The dispute over Gorsuch is only the beginning of the coming fights during the next four years.  The sea change necessary to correct the direction of the nation after eight years of Obama’s leadership is substantial.  The many seriously needed policy changes are hard to attain under any circumstances; it is harder when Republicans are divided.  The electorate decided that an outsider and strong personality was necessary, as the political process had become too entrenched.  They rejected more conventional conservative Republicans.

Four year ago, I supported Mitt Romney’s election. I could not believe that Obama was re-elected.  Romney did not fight hard enough, nor make the case for his election.  Romney did not push the conversation toward freedom and capitalism, as if he was uncomfortable with his success and wealth.  On the other hand, Trump proudly proclaimed his support of the free enterprise system and his success, with concern for those left behind.  It was disturbing to see Romney oppose Trump, but they have publicly repaired that rift.

Had Romney been successful, he would have altered the direction Obama had chosen.  However, he is not the decisive personality that is Trump, and we would not get the needed change in Washington that re-establishes our federalism and limited government.  Trump is not ideologically conservative, but a practical constitutionalist.  He outlined in his inaugural speech his vision of reduced power in Washington and dispersal to the states.  Domestic power has centralized for too long.  People voted for Donald Trump in large part for this nomination to the Supreme Court.

Gorsuch is an originalist and textualist.  He supports religious liberty.  He took the time in his speech to remind us that judges rule on the law and should not make law from the bench.  He does not agree with Justice Ginsburg, who believes that the Constitution is a breathing document meant for evolutionary change.  Hillary Clinton most certainly would have given us such a person.  Can the NeverTrumps now see their error?  Gorsuch is an advocate of separation of powers, which conservatives proclaim is fundamental.  His educational pedigree is impeccable, and he hails from a traditional political family.

Our country has seen an amazing ten days.  Trump will continue to keep his campaign promises despite the opposition from the power elite.  He has the potential to be an impactful president for generations.  A strong leader will irritate many, but his policies have followed his campaign promises, rare for any politician.  His rhetoric and style are unusual.  He demonstrated grace when he presented Neil Gorsuch.  Will Republicans unite to make any filibuster less likely?  Will the Senate get this done before several significant cases come before the Court?  Stay tuned to this real-time action show.

With the nomination of Neil Gorsuch for the position of associate justice of the Supreme Court, taking the seat of former Justice Scalia, President Trump has kept another promise made during his campaign.  Before discussing the merits of this nomination, it is time for his conservative opponents to recognize that Donald Trump has swiftly changed the direction of the nation toward a more constitutional, citizen-oriented federal government.

The new administration does need to learn from this week’s errors in implementation regarding the vetting of refugees from questionable nations; there is little doubt that they will develop improved methodology that will reduce confusion.  However, there can be no doubt that the Democrats have abandoned any possibility of a honeymoon period for the new president.  They have determined that their future resides in a strong liberal opposition to traditional federalism.  Slow-walking cabinet nominees is but one such technique.

Democrats will continue to raise funds through the Soros approach, applying anarchy through extreme groups marching against most policies the Trump administration will support.  They will utilize group identity politics supporting minorities, feminists, abortion advocates, the poor, and disadvantaged persons.  Can any conservative still argue that they should not coalesce behind Donald Trump on most issues?  Will these conservatives watch from the sidelines while progressives hinder conservative policies?

Why is this necessary?  The dispute over Gorsuch is only the beginning of the coming fights during the next four years.  The sea change necessary to correct the direction of the nation after eight years of Obama’s leadership is substantial.  The many seriously needed policy changes are hard to attain under any circumstances; it is harder when Republicans are divided.  The electorate decided that an outsider and strong personality was necessary, as the political process had become too entrenched.  They rejected more conventional conservative Republicans.

Four year ago, I supported Mitt Romney’s election. I could not believe that Obama was re-elected.  Romney did not fight hard enough, nor make the case for his election.  Romney did not push the conversation toward freedom and capitalism, as if he was uncomfortable with his success and wealth.  On the other hand, Trump proudly proclaimed his support of the free enterprise system and his success, with concern for those left behind.  It was disturbing to see Romney oppose Trump, but they have publicly repaired that rift.

Had Romney been successful, he would have altered the direction Obama had chosen.  However, he is not the decisive personality that is Trump, and we would not get the needed change in Washington that re-establishes our federalism and limited government.  Trump is not ideologically conservative, but a practical constitutionalist.  He outlined in his inaugural speech his vision of reduced power in Washington and dispersal to the states.  Domestic power has centralized for too long.  People voted for Donald Trump in large part for this nomination to the Supreme Court.

Gorsuch is an originalist and textualist.  He supports religious liberty.  He took the time in his speech to remind us that judges rule on the law and should not make law from the bench.  He does not agree with Justice Ginsburg, who believes that the Constitution is a breathing document meant for evolutionary change.  Hillary Clinton most certainly would have given us such a person.  Can the NeverTrumps now see their error?  Gorsuch is an advocate of separation of powers, which conservatives proclaim is fundamental.  His educational pedigree is impeccable, and he hails from a traditional political family.

Our country has seen an amazing ten days.  Trump will continue to keep his campaign promises despite the opposition from the power elite.  He has the potential to be an impactful president for generations.  A strong leader will irritate many, but his policies have followed his campaign promises, rare for any politician.  His rhetoric and style are unusual.  He demonstrated grace when he presented Neil Gorsuch.  Will Republicans unite to make any filibuster less likely?  Will the Senate get this done before several significant cases come before the Court?  Stay tuned to this real-time action show.