Is Hillary plotting a return to politics?

Even washed up politicians know a political vacuum when they see one, and the Clintons are no exception.

The New York Post reports that "Hillary Clinton is looking for a path to return to the political fray," referencing a Politico column that draws on interviews with Clinton associates to discuss Mrs. Clinton's political future.

Politico is talking up Hillary Clinton's "next move," but it seems that the Clintons still have some explaining to do.  Politico quotes a "close Hillary Clinton friend":

She understands that a forensic exam of the campaign is necessary, not only for her, but for the party and other electeds, and for the investors in the campaign.

People want to know that their investment was treated with respect, but that their mistakes wouldn't be repeated.

While Bill Clinton has been "calling longtime friends to rail against FBI Director James Comey's late campaign intervention and Russia's involvement," according to Politico, supporters and donors want better answers:

And some Clinton supporters in the states are irritated by the lack of a formal, public-facing autopsy from her campaign since the absence of even a preliminary acknowledgment of fault has made it harder for the party to raise money on a local level — donors feel burned.

With donors feeling burned and the Clinton Global Initiative apparently winding down, one might think the Clintons would quietly go away, but one close associate, Politico says, predicts their eventual return to the scene – "resilience is in the Clintons' DNA."

This means that the Clintons will continue to plague the political landscape for the foreseeable future, with the recent self-serving rumors of a Hillary run for New York City mayor serving as a case in point.

While Politico claims that "neither Clinton is likely to run for office again," the Clinton fundraising machine could help future Democrats, and Politico adds that "Hillary Clinton's victory over Trump in the popular vote underscores the potential use of promoting her as a surrogate for the next crop of candidates."

Politico goes on to speculate that the Clintons' "own popularity could rebound – especially when the Trump administration runs up against popular pieces of Bill Clinton's White House and Hillary Clinton's State Department legacies."

The reader is left to imagine what "popular pieces" of Mrs. Clinton's State Department legacy might consist of.

Politico alludes to the fact that certain Clinton operatives are "relaunching" "major left-leaning organizations" to oppose President Trump, but what they fail to mention is that Mrs. Clinton is right in the mix with longtime Clinton henchman David Brock, who among other things has organized a group of big-money liberal donors to "take down President Donald Trump through impeachment."

A recent account at Time.com notes that the "slate" for the Brock donor meeting included Chicago mayor Rahm Emanuel, and the article also recounts Mrs. Clinton's role in the background:

"What we are going to do is use litigation as a way of tying Trump up in knots every way we can," Brock says.

Among those who have advised him on the plan is Hillary Clinton, who suggested to Brock in a phone call after the election that he should sign up some top-notch litigators who would do pro bono work against Trump. "She spoke about trying to construct a suit that would get you discovery on potential or alleged contacts between the Trump organization and the Russian government," Brock remembers.

The Time article goes on to note that "Clinton is likely to remain a counselor" to Mr. Brock.

Is it just coincidental that Politico is talking up Hillary's "next move" two days after Saturday's pink-hat women's march? 

Perhaps, but as The Hill describes a Clinton tweet, Hillary "lavished praise" on the protestors "marching for our values," with Hillary joining the who's who of liberal politicians clamoring to get in front of the "sister march" parade.

The best advice for Mrs. Clinton may have come from former Democratic Arkansas senator Mark Pryor, quoted in the Politico piece: "she just needs to get away for a while."

Even washed up politicians know a political vacuum when they see one, and the Clintons are no exception.

The New York Post reports that "Hillary Clinton is looking for a path to return to the political fray," referencing a Politico column that draws on interviews with Clinton associates to discuss Mrs. Clinton's political future.

Politico is talking up Hillary Clinton's "next move," but it seems that the Clintons still have some explaining to do.  Politico quotes a "close Hillary Clinton friend":

She understands that a forensic exam of the campaign is necessary, not only for her, but for the party and other electeds, and for the investors in the campaign.

People want to know that their investment was treated with respect, but that their mistakes wouldn't be repeated.

While Bill Clinton has been "calling longtime friends to rail against FBI Director James Comey's late campaign intervention and Russia's involvement," according to Politico, supporters and donors want better answers:

And some Clinton supporters in the states are irritated by the lack of a formal, public-facing autopsy from her campaign since the absence of even a preliminary acknowledgment of fault has made it harder for the party to raise money on a local level — donors feel burned.

With donors feeling burned and the Clinton Global Initiative apparently winding down, one might think the Clintons would quietly go away, but one close associate, Politico says, predicts their eventual return to the scene – "resilience is in the Clintons' DNA."

This means that the Clintons will continue to plague the political landscape for the foreseeable future, with the recent self-serving rumors of a Hillary run for New York City mayor serving as a case in point.

While Politico claims that "neither Clinton is likely to run for office again," the Clinton fundraising machine could help future Democrats, and Politico adds that "Hillary Clinton's victory over Trump in the popular vote underscores the potential use of promoting her as a surrogate for the next crop of candidates."

Politico goes on to speculate that the Clintons' "own popularity could rebound – especially when the Trump administration runs up against popular pieces of Bill Clinton's White House and Hillary Clinton's State Department legacies."

The reader is left to imagine what "popular pieces" of Mrs. Clinton's State Department legacy might consist of.

Politico alludes to the fact that certain Clinton operatives are "relaunching" "major left-leaning organizations" to oppose President Trump, but what they fail to mention is that Mrs. Clinton is right in the mix with longtime Clinton henchman David Brock, who among other things has organized a group of big-money liberal donors to "take down President Donald Trump through impeachment."

A recent account at Time.com notes that the "slate" for the Brock donor meeting included Chicago mayor Rahm Emanuel, and the article also recounts Mrs. Clinton's role in the background:

"What we are going to do is use litigation as a way of tying Trump up in knots every way we can," Brock says.

Among those who have advised him on the plan is Hillary Clinton, who suggested to Brock in a phone call after the election that he should sign up some top-notch litigators who would do pro bono work against Trump. "She spoke about trying to construct a suit that would get you discovery on potential or alleged contacts between the Trump organization and the Russian government," Brock remembers.

The Time article goes on to note that "Clinton is likely to remain a counselor" to Mr. Brock.

Is it just coincidental that Politico is talking up Hillary's "next move" two days after Saturday's pink-hat women's march? 

Perhaps, but as The Hill describes a Clinton tweet, Hillary "lavished praise" on the protestors "marching for our values," with Hillary joining the who's who of liberal politicians clamoring to get in front of the "sister march" parade.

The best advice for Mrs. Clinton may have come from former Democratic Arkansas senator Mark Pryor, quoted in the Politico piece: "she just needs to get away for a while."