The wealthy bizman conundrum

Much has been made, both before and after the epic 2016 U.S. elections, of the anomaly of a "billionaire blue-collar" guy going for the brass ring.

That cacophonous ringing you hear is the Quasimope-o caterwauling of Democrats wringing and pinging their metaphors over the Donald's many holdings.  The issue, in fine, is the huge potential for conflict of interest.  Trump's hotels, for one thing, are attractive lures to foreign statesmen.  Those seeking to curry favor with the new president can claim – and already have claimed – to be staying at the seductive temples of transit, shoppes, and high-octane emporia.  They know that Trump benefits from their stay, benefits from their custom.

But the problem goes beyond just rentals and hotels.  Trump is a hydra – he owns assets all over the world, some obscure, some less so.  The public does not wish to fret about Trump dividing his allegiance between the American polity and what is good for them and his own considerable wealth-deploying proprietorship of TV shows, pageants, commercial tie-ins, and the welter of amazing menu of his projects and accomplishments.

It's a conundrum of sorts, since the presidency was not designed for lifelong pols, as a stream of founding fathers spoke and wrote.  Yet that is what, to date – with few early exceptions – we have had.

Yes, the ideal candidate or representative was a gentleman with business or career interests who became president for a term or two, then left the presidency to return to business, law, craft, science, or technical pursuits.

Now we have the problem of a wealthy man, winner Donald J. Trump, being faced with the divestiture or destruction of a life's successful work, and the public opinion (read: demoniacs) clamoring for him to sell or divest, and not to hand over the reins to his capable progeny.  Eric, Donald Junior, Ivanka, and her capable husband, Jared Kushner, have all managed and handled large tranches of the Trump empire.  But the worry is that the Chinese wall will not be maintained, his business concerns will simmer to the top of his agenda, and his functioning as president will fall through the polished polyurethane high-gloss floorboards.

Although stated as a joke, not a few people have observed that for Trump, residing in the fabled White House is likely a step down, compared to...well, his golden digs at the burnished Trump Tower on Fifth Avenue and his fabulous Mar a Lago in Florida.

Still.

That seems unfair.  When Trump ends his tenure, perhaps in 2024, he will not have his cathedral of businesses, property, or hotels, enterprises that took decades to amass.  He will then have only the same grifting that lies ahead for the current descending #44, the business-less community disorganizer, the hubris-enriched Barack H. Obama.

He needs a "Chinese Wall," as the lawyers say – a deep divide between the political and the commercial – but the exact lineaments of such are tricky to negotiate or even figure out with fairness to his laudable pursuits and achievements.

One cannot dump a property, hotels, casinos, apartment, and other edifices without massive fire-sale losses.  We cannot expect a new president to take a bath on his entire life achievements before he assumes the reins of 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue.  Sales are delicate matters, and they hang on a multitude of interests, issues, trending currents, and intangibles.

Is there an easy answer, one doable within the six-week window before Trump, #45, takes over the shambles left by #44?

Not off the tip of the tongue.  Flotillas of accountants and assorted legal eagles and money men are burning the midnight Exxon to figure out how to divest while not divesting, to suit the law and the temper of the crybaby don't-get-me-started-on-Trumpers.

Stay tuned.

Much has been made, both before and after the epic 2016 U.S. elections, of the anomaly of a "billionaire blue-collar" guy going for the brass ring.

That cacophonous ringing you hear is the Quasimope-o caterwauling of Democrats wringing and pinging their metaphors over the Donald's many holdings.  The issue, in fine, is the huge potential for conflict of interest.  Trump's hotels, for one thing, are attractive lures to foreign statesmen.  Those seeking to curry favor with the new president can claim – and already have claimed – to be staying at the seductive temples of transit, shoppes, and high-octane emporia.  They know that Trump benefits from their stay, benefits from their custom.

But the problem goes beyond just rentals and hotels.  Trump is a hydra – he owns assets all over the world, some obscure, some less so.  The public does not wish to fret about Trump dividing his allegiance between the American polity and what is good for them and his own considerable wealth-deploying proprietorship of TV shows, pageants, commercial tie-ins, and the welter of amazing menu of his projects and accomplishments.

It's a conundrum of sorts, since the presidency was not designed for lifelong pols, as a stream of founding fathers spoke and wrote.  Yet that is what, to date – with few early exceptions – we have had.

Yes, the ideal candidate or representative was a gentleman with business or career interests who became president for a term or two, then left the presidency to return to business, law, craft, science, or technical pursuits.

Now we have the problem of a wealthy man, winner Donald J. Trump, being faced with the divestiture or destruction of a life's successful work, and the public opinion (read: demoniacs) clamoring for him to sell or divest, and not to hand over the reins to his capable progeny.  Eric, Donald Junior, Ivanka, and her capable husband, Jared Kushner, have all managed and handled large tranches of the Trump empire.  But the worry is that the Chinese wall will not be maintained, his business concerns will simmer to the top of his agenda, and his functioning as president will fall through the polished polyurethane high-gloss floorboards.

Although stated as a joke, not a few people have observed that for Trump, residing in the fabled White House is likely a step down, compared to...well, his golden digs at the burnished Trump Tower on Fifth Avenue and his fabulous Mar a Lago in Florida.

Still.

That seems unfair.  When Trump ends his tenure, perhaps in 2024, he will not have his cathedral of businesses, property, or hotels, enterprises that took decades to amass.  He will then have only the same grifting that lies ahead for the current descending #44, the business-less community disorganizer, the hubris-enriched Barack H. Obama.

He needs a "Chinese Wall," as the lawyers say – a deep divide between the political and the commercial – but the exact lineaments of such are tricky to negotiate or even figure out with fairness to his laudable pursuits and achievements.

One cannot dump a property, hotels, casinos, apartment, and other edifices without massive fire-sale losses.  We cannot expect a new president to take a bath on his entire life achievements before he assumes the reins of 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue.  Sales are delicate matters, and they hang on a multitude of interests, issues, trending currents, and intangibles.

Is there an easy answer, one doable within the six-week window before Trump, #45, takes over the shambles left by #44?

Not off the tip of the tongue.  Flotillas of accountants and assorted legal eagles and money men are burning the midnight Exxon to figure out how to divest while not divesting, to suit the law and the temper of the crybaby don't-get-me-started-on-Trumpers.

Stay tuned.