Not a 'red tape' country, but a 'red carpet' country

At Donald Trump's recent victory tour through Michigan, one of the speakers was a powerful CEO from a major industrial power in the United States, Andrew Liveris of Dow Chemical.  Mr. Liveris, whom Trump has appointed to chair his American Manufacturing Council, announced that Dow soon will create a new research and development center in Michigan that will provide two hundred jobs.  He made it crystal-clear that the decision to build it in the U.S. when it could have been located anywhere in the world was directly attributable to the industry-friendly policies of our incoming president.

In his speech, Liveris used an expression that should be adopted and promoted by the Trump administration:

"We could have waited," Liveris said. "We could have put it anywhere in the world. ... We're going to use American hard work and American dreams and we're going to fight for the Dow Company in the U.S.A."

"You're paving the way through your administration your policies to make it easier to do business in this country," Liveris told Trump. "Not a red tape country, but a red carpet country for American business. That's what we have to do."

I don't know about you, but that particular phraseology just lit up in my mind, eliciting an involuntary "hell yeah!"  My desire for an America that is a red carpet country rather than a red tape country was my primary motivation for supporting Donald Trump; I just never thought to voice it quite that way in all my pre-election writings on his behalf.

If the Trump administration wants a catchphrase for its economic plan, it could do a lot worse than The Red Carpet.  It's every bit as catchy as the New Deal and a lot more self-explanatory.

At Donald Trump's recent victory tour through Michigan, one of the speakers was a powerful CEO from a major industrial power in the United States, Andrew Liveris of Dow Chemical.  Mr. Liveris, whom Trump has appointed to chair his American Manufacturing Council, announced that Dow soon will create a new research and development center in Michigan that will provide two hundred jobs.  He made it crystal-clear that the decision to build it in the U.S. when it could have been located anywhere in the world was directly attributable to the industry-friendly policies of our incoming president.

In his speech, Liveris used an expression that should be adopted and promoted by the Trump administration:

"We could have waited," Liveris said. "We could have put it anywhere in the world. ... We're going to use American hard work and American dreams and we're going to fight for the Dow Company in the U.S.A."

"You're paving the way through your administration your policies to make it easier to do business in this country," Liveris told Trump. "Not a red tape country, but a red carpet country for American business. That's what we have to do."

I don't know about you, but that particular phraseology just lit up in my mind, eliciting an involuntary "hell yeah!"  My desire for an America that is a red carpet country rather than a red tape country was my primary motivation for supporting Donald Trump; I just never thought to voice it quite that way in all my pre-election writings on his behalf.

If the Trump administration wants a catchphrase for its economic plan, it could do a lot worse than The Red Carpet.  It's every bit as catchy as the New Deal and a lot more self-explanatory.