Feeling ‘safe’ in the Trump era

The other night, I watched a local newscast covering the crowds who took to the streets to “protest” the election of Donald Trump.  Aside from the fact that the crowd resembled the crowds that had marched under the various “Occupy” banners (and seemed to use much of the same rhetoric), I noticed that the local reporter, rather than maintaining an air of professional detachment, barely hid her glee and, when describing the protesters’ aims, expressed them as “we want” such-and-such and “we feel” this way or that.

In the same newscast, we were treated to interviews with “Hispanics” who expressed that they “didn’t feel safe” with Donald Trump as president.

And I can understand that.  Everyone wants to feel safe.  I imagine that these “Hispanics” (a term I’ve never cared for; it actually means “people from Spain or of Spanish heritage,” which really doesn’t adequately or accurately describe folks from south of the border) cherish the feeling of being safe as much as anyone else.

I guess they want to feel as safe as Kate Steinle felt, strolling on a San Francisco pier with her dad that evening in the summer of 2015, before she was shot to death (with a stolen handgun, and for no apparent reason!) by an "undocumented immigrant" from Mexico (who had already been deported multiple times but somehow managed to come back).

I guess they want to feel as safe as all the motorists (estimated as averaging ten a day) felt as they drove along, on their way to work or wherever, just before they were slammed into and grievously injured or killed by an “undocumented immigrant” from Mexico driving drunk and without a driver’s license (many of whom have been deported multiple times but somehow managed to come back).

I guess they want to feel as safe as parts of the U.S. were before they became infested with violent Mexican gangs who bring in drugs as well as their murderous ways (and many of whose members have been deported multiple times but somehow managed to come back).  And I’m sure they want to feel as safe as we all felt before we had to worry about terrorists in our midst, whether such terrorists have infiltrated our borders, are among “refugees” brought in by our government, or are our own citizens who have been “radicalized,” and any of whom may walk among us until he one day decides to go on a murder spree.

Well, I can certainly understand why “Hispanics,” or any other American citizen or legal visitor, would want to feel safe here.  And I hope that, with Donald Trump’s policies regarding immigration, terrorism, and law and order, we’ll all start to feel a lot safer starting Jan. 20.

Meanwhile, I already feel that our First and Second Amendments are “safer,” our Constitution and Supreme Court are safer, and talk radio is “safer.”  So far, so good.

The other night, I watched a local newscast covering the crowds who took to the streets to “protest” the election of Donald Trump.  Aside from the fact that the crowd resembled the crowds that had marched under the various “Occupy” banners (and seemed to use much of the same rhetoric), I noticed that the local reporter, rather than maintaining an air of professional detachment, barely hid her glee and, when describing the protesters’ aims, expressed them as “we want” such-and-such and “we feel” this way or that.

In the same newscast, we were treated to interviews with “Hispanics” who expressed that they “didn’t feel safe” with Donald Trump as president.

And I can understand that.  Everyone wants to feel safe.  I imagine that these “Hispanics” (a term I’ve never cared for; it actually means “people from Spain or of Spanish heritage,” which really doesn’t adequately or accurately describe folks from south of the border) cherish the feeling of being safe as much as anyone else.

I guess they want to feel as safe as Kate Steinle felt, strolling on a San Francisco pier with her dad that evening in the summer of 2015, before she was shot to death (with a stolen handgun, and for no apparent reason!) by an "undocumented immigrant" from Mexico (who had already been deported multiple times but somehow managed to come back).

I guess they want to feel as safe as all the motorists (estimated as averaging ten a day) felt as they drove along, on their way to work or wherever, just before they were slammed into and grievously injured or killed by an “undocumented immigrant” from Mexico driving drunk and without a driver’s license (many of whom have been deported multiple times but somehow managed to come back).

I guess they want to feel as safe as parts of the U.S. were before they became infested with violent Mexican gangs who bring in drugs as well as their murderous ways (and many of whose members have been deported multiple times but somehow managed to come back).  And I’m sure they want to feel as safe as we all felt before we had to worry about terrorists in our midst, whether such terrorists have infiltrated our borders, are among “refugees” brought in by our government, or are our own citizens who have been “radicalized,” and any of whom may walk among us until he one day decides to go on a murder spree.

Well, I can certainly understand why “Hispanics,” or any other American citizen or legal visitor, would want to feel safe here.  And I hope that, with Donald Trump’s policies regarding immigration, terrorism, and law and order, we’ll all start to feel a lot safer starting Jan. 20.

Meanwhile, I already feel that our First and Second Amendments are “safer,” our Constitution and Supreme Court are safer, and talk radio is “safer.”  So far, so good.