The tip of the government corruption iceberg

In the George Orwell novel 1984, a scenario is presented in which nations go to war against each other not to win, but simply by agreement, to keep their populations subjugated. 

It has been suggested that the Democrats and Republicans are doing a version of the same thing, not with military warfare, but politically.  While some of their differences are genuine, and some of the conflicts between them are real, there is a tacit agreement between the two major parties that neither side will destroy the other.  It is far too important to keep the public distracted while maintaining the power, perquisites, and privileges the ruling class enjoys. 

Thus it is that both parties make promises they seem never to keep.  Power almost never devolves to the people, but rather, instead, it is nearly always the government that gets more of it.

Power is a zero-sum game.  The more of it the government has, the less of it the people have.

While we argue and bicker among ourselves about whatever events dictate the headlines, we see at most only the tip of the social iceberg – if even that much.  Deep down in the basements and bowels of the government, the dirty deals are made, the crimes are committed, and corruption flourishes unabated.

Perhaps for the first time in history, some of the curtains have momentarily been pushed aside, if only a tiny bit.  We have caught a glimpse of just how vile and devious those in power have become.  It should be no surprise to us.  For many years we have witnessed men of modest means get elected to office and then, after a brief stint, become millionaires – and not from their salaries.

Along comes Donald Trump, and for the first time in decades, the establishment feels truly threatened, both Democrats and Republicans alike.  They now face a common enemy, a wrecking ball who, if elected, will not follow the rules of decorum and appeasement, but will actually do what the people demand.  He promises secure borders, safer streets, foreign policy that serves the nation, and a free-market economy instead of the increasingly socialist one that stifles growth and costs jobs.

It remains to be seen whether this uncouth, boorish egomaniac can wrest power from the kleptocrats who rule over us.  Maybe he is not the ideal man for the job – but he is all we have.

Even if Trump fails, the revolution has already begun.  It may falter and sputter, and in the end, it may never find the Reaganesque leader we dream of.  Then again, maybe we don't need one.

In the George Orwell novel 1984, a scenario is presented in which nations go to war against each other not to win, but simply by agreement, to keep their populations subjugated. 

It has been suggested that the Democrats and Republicans are doing a version of the same thing, not with military warfare, but politically.  While some of their differences are genuine, and some of the conflicts between them are real, there is a tacit agreement between the two major parties that neither side will destroy the other.  It is far too important to keep the public distracted while maintaining the power, perquisites, and privileges the ruling class enjoys. 

Thus it is that both parties make promises they seem never to keep.  Power almost never devolves to the people, but rather, instead, it is nearly always the government that gets more of it.

Power is a zero-sum game.  The more of it the government has, the less of it the people have.

While we argue and bicker among ourselves about whatever events dictate the headlines, we see at most only the tip of the social iceberg – if even that much.  Deep down in the basements and bowels of the government, the dirty deals are made, the crimes are committed, and corruption flourishes unabated.

Perhaps for the first time in history, some of the curtains have momentarily been pushed aside, if only a tiny bit.  We have caught a glimpse of just how vile and devious those in power have become.  It should be no surprise to us.  For many years we have witnessed men of modest means get elected to office and then, after a brief stint, become millionaires – and not from their salaries.

Along comes Donald Trump, and for the first time in decades, the establishment feels truly threatened, both Democrats and Republicans alike.  They now face a common enemy, a wrecking ball who, if elected, will not follow the rules of decorum and appeasement, but will actually do what the people demand.  He promises secure borders, safer streets, foreign policy that serves the nation, and a free-market economy instead of the increasingly socialist one that stifles growth and costs jobs.

It remains to be seen whether this uncouth, boorish egomaniac can wrest power from the kleptocrats who rule over us.  Maybe he is not the ideal man for the job – but he is all we have.

Even if Trump fails, the revolution has already begun.  It may falter and sputter, and in the end, it may never find the Reaganesque leader we dream of.  Then again, maybe we don't need one.