The pictures Hillary Clinton doesn't see

At her website, Hillary Clinton devotes a page to "Immigration Reform."  She begins:

We need comprehensive immigration reform with a pathway to full and equal citizenship.

As legal immigrants already have a full and equal pathway to citizenship, Clinton is not talking about them.  She is talking about illegal immigrants.

Following this statement, there is a nearly full-screen photo – a picture of Clinton and a young girl, apparently Hispanic, in a deep, heartfelt embrace.

In the background are several signs on a wall, all saying the same thing: "Estoy contigo" (Spanish for "I am with you").  All this serves to suggest that the girl is in the U.S. illegally.

Following this photo, a video appears.  In it, Clinton speaks of taking steps so Americans know "what the human costs of these [current immigration] policies is."  No doubt, she is speaking of the kind of human costs suggested by the young girl she embraces in the photo.

Those costs are indeed real.  But there are other costs as well.  There are costs to taxpayers.  Taxpayers are humans, too.  But there are no pictures of the costs to them.

And there is another cost – a cost to those waiting to immigrate legally.  Almost certainly, massive numbers of illegal immigrants make their wait longer.  Or even futile.  But there is no picture of them.

And there is another cost – a cost to the rule of law.  This is the most important cost.  For without the rule of law, there would be no foundation for a free economy and the other freedoms and the democracy that we enjoy.  Without the rule of law, we would be not at all different from many of the nations immigrants to America leave – nations that are poverty-stricken and repressive.  Lawlessness is an injury not simply to a principle, but to people.  But there is no picture of it.

This is the most important picture that Clinton does not see.  For on her web page, she also says her “comprehensive immigration reform with a pathway to full and equal citizenship … [will] uphold the rule of law.” Harsh as it may be, you can’t uphold the rule of law by rewarding and embracing those who break it.  And particularly when it is to the detriment of those who comply.

At her website, Hillary Clinton devotes a page to "Immigration Reform."  She begins:

We need comprehensive immigration reform with a pathway to full and equal citizenship.

As legal immigrants already have a full and equal pathway to citizenship, Clinton is not talking about them.  She is talking about illegal immigrants.

Following this statement, there is a nearly full-screen photo – a picture of Clinton and a young girl, apparently Hispanic, in a deep, heartfelt embrace.

In the background are several signs on a wall, all saying the same thing: "Estoy contigo" (Spanish for "I am with you").  All this serves to suggest that the girl is in the U.S. illegally.

Following this photo, a video appears.  In it, Clinton speaks of taking steps so Americans know "what the human costs of these [current immigration] policies is."  No doubt, she is speaking of the kind of human costs suggested by the young girl she embraces in the photo.

Those costs are indeed real.  But there are other costs as well.  There are costs to taxpayers.  Taxpayers are humans, too.  But there are no pictures of the costs to them.

And there is another cost – a cost to those waiting to immigrate legally.  Almost certainly, massive numbers of illegal immigrants make their wait longer.  Or even futile.  But there is no picture of them.

And there is another cost – a cost to the rule of law.  This is the most important cost.  For without the rule of law, there would be no foundation for a free economy and the other freedoms and the democracy that we enjoy.  Without the rule of law, we would be not at all different from many of the nations immigrants to America leave – nations that are poverty-stricken and repressive.  Lawlessness is an injury not simply to a principle, but to people.  But there is no picture of it.

This is the most important picture that Clinton does not see.  For on her web page, she also says her “comprehensive immigration reform with a pathway to full and equal citizenship … [will] uphold the rule of law.” Harsh as it may be, you can’t uphold the rule of law by rewarding and embracing those who break it.  And particularly when it is to the detriment of those who comply.