Sarah Palin led to Donald Trump, whines the president

The president continues to blame everyone but himself for opposition to his agenda. 

In an extensive interview with New York magazine, subtitled in part as "a very early draft of his memoirs," the president feigns concern that ordinary Americans have not fallen in line with his promised fundamental transformation.  Politico excerpts a portion of the interview:

I see a straight line from the announcement of Sarah Palin as the vice-presidential nominee to what we see today in Donald Trump, the emergence of the Freedom Caucus, the tea party, and the shift in the center of gravity for the Republican Party[.] ...

... Whether that changes, I think, will depend in part on the outcome of this election, but it's also going to depend on the degree of self-reflection inside the Republican Party. There have been at least a couple of other times that I've said confidently that the fever is going to have to break, but it just seems to get worse.

This particular fever may be said to be the result of a serious infection by far left policies that the body politic has been resisting with varying results for the past eight years.

In another portion of the New York interview, the president reflects on his "plan B" when Senator Scott Brown was elected in Massachusetts as the so-called sixtieth vote against the Affordable Care Act.  Mr. Obama praises the "really deft work by Nancy and Harry" and describes the votes he obtained from "these young guys who had the most to lose" in the House, of whom the magazine observes, "And they almost all lost their seats."

Farther along in the interview, the president blames politics for the unwillingness of a Republican Congress to bail out Obamacare.  The Washington Examiner provides highlights:

In my mind, the [Affordable Care Act] has been a huge success, but it's got real problems[.] ...

But you hit a point where if Congress just is not willing to make any constructive modifications and it's all political football, then you're getting a suboptimal solution[.] ...

[T]he truth is that the ACA vote showed that when push came to shove and people had to do something they thought was right, even if it was not going to be helpful to their reelection, the majority of Democrats were willing to do it.

The translation is that most Americans remain opposed to the Affordable Care Act, and only Democrats are noble enough to fall on their swords to vote in opposition of their constituents.

While speaking of those elected representatives whose votes he needed to pass the health care law, the president also displays his thinly disguised contempt for said constituents:

But it means that what you're really saying to them is, "This is the right thing to do and I'll come to your fund-raiser in Podunk and I will make sure that I've got your back."

Podunk is variously defined as "a hypothetical small town regarded as typically dull or insignificant" or a name "often used in the upper case as a placeholder name, to indicate insignificance and lack of importance."

Yes, and the home of those knuckle-dragging bitter clingers, and those baskets of deplorables.

The president continues to blame everyone but himself for opposition to his agenda. 

In an extensive interview with New York magazine, subtitled in part as "a very early draft of his memoirs," the president feigns concern that ordinary Americans have not fallen in line with his promised fundamental transformation.  Politico excerpts a portion of the interview:

I see a straight line from the announcement of Sarah Palin as the vice-presidential nominee to what we see today in Donald Trump, the emergence of the Freedom Caucus, the tea party, and the shift in the center of gravity for the Republican Party[.] ...

... Whether that changes, I think, will depend in part on the outcome of this election, but it's also going to depend on the degree of self-reflection inside the Republican Party. There have been at least a couple of other times that I've said confidently that the fever is going to have to break, but it just seems to get worse.

This particular fever may be said to be the result of a serious infection by far left policies that the body politic has been resisting with varying results for the past eight years.

In another portion of the New York interview, the president reflects on his "plan B" when Senator Scott Brown was elected in Massachusetts as the so-called sixtieth vote against the Affordable Care Act.  Mr. Obama praises the "really deft work by Nancy and Harry" and describes the votes he obtained from "these young guys who had the most to lose" in the House, of whom the magazine observes, "And they almost all lost their seats."

Farther along in the interview, the president blames politics for the unwillingness of a Republican Congress to bail out Obamacare.  The Washington Examiner provides highlights:

In my mind, the [Affordable Care Act] has been a huge success, but it's got real problems[.] ...

But you hit a point where if Congress just is not willing to make any constructive modifications and it's all political football, then you're getting a suboptimal solution[.] ...

[T]he truth is that the ACA vote showed that when push came to shove and people had to do something they thought was right, even if it was not going to be helpful to their reelection, the majority of Democrats were willing to do it.

The translation is that most Americans remain opposed to the Affordable Care Act, and only Democrats are noble enough to fall on their swords to vote in opposition of their constituents.

While speaking of those elected representatives whose votes he needed to pass the health care law, the president also displays his thinly disguised contempt for said constituents:

But it means that what you're really saying to them is, "This is the right thing to do and I'll come to your fund-raiser in Podunk and I will make sure that I've got your back."

Podunk is variously defined as "a hypothetical small town regarded as typically dull or insignificant" or a name "often used in the upper case as a placeholder name, to indicate insignificance and lack of importance."

Yes, and the home of those knuckle-dragging bitter clingers, and those baskets of deplorables.