The real meaning of Brexit

On June 23, 2016, Great Britain voted to rule itself.  I have got to repeat that.  Britain voted to rule itself.  I have to repeat it even to myself.  The Remain camp wanted Great Britain to be ruled by 28 members of a secret cabal called the Commission.  Every trick in the book was used to obscure the main issue.  Were we to be ruled by Brussels/Strasbourg, or were we to make our own laws at Westminster? 

We were promised by the Remain camp that the economy would take a hit – they were right.  It was a self-fulfilling prophecy.  The markets fell, and the markets climbed back.  Some traders made a packet; some companies’ values fell.  Nothing really new in that, since the value of companies is always rising and falling.  The Stock Exchange is a gamblers’ paradise.

The dust of conflict has not yet settled, and surely it will take some time for it to settle, for the simple reason that many people had not even been aware that we as a nation no longer ruled ourselves.  We had our own Parliament – of course, we ruled ourselves.  Alas, that simply was not true.  We were under the dominion of a foreign body called the EU, whose laws pre-empted our laws, whose Courts were superior to our Courts.

It all happened by stealth, by bits and pieces, by treaties like Maastricht, so that the man in the street hardly noticed that his liberties were being eroded piece by piece.  Regulations appeared from Brussels, and suddenly they were law.  Companies were bound down with useless and time-consuming red tape, and there was no recourse.  There was nobody to appeal to.  We were under the dominion of a body that could simply demand from us any amount of money that it chose.

Not what we as a nation chose, but what Herr Juncker and his 27 commissars chose.  It is useless for the Remainders to argue that it was a lie to say that we were and are presently paying into the EU some £350 million a week, since we get some of it back as a rebate, since these figures can clearly be looked up on the internet.

Let us be clear, then.  We are taxed by our own government, we are taxed by our local authority, and in addition we have given a blank cheque to the EU to tax us for whatever they deem to be a budget to support their overweening bureaucracy.  Bit by bit, our liberties were taken away.

Some people now argue that the Referendum was unfair.  While over 17 million voted to leave the EU, some 15 million voted to remain.  So the Remain camp feels deprived.  However, let us imagine what the result would have been if the Referendum question had been worded differently.

Do you wish to be governed by Brussels/Strasbourg?

Do you wish to be governed by Parliament at Westminster?

Had the question been phrased in this manner, can anyone doubt that the vote for self-governance would have been overwhelming?  Could any warm-blooded Englishman or Scotsman, for that matter, have ever voted to be ruled by a foreign entity, however benign it may have seemed?  Of course not!  The vote would have been 85% to 15%, which is why the Independents have to make clear their case, even though they have won.  For it is imperative that the British people understand just what they have achieved and let it not slip from their hands through ignorance of the realities.

So Nicola Sturgeon flies over to Brussels to plead that Scotland wishes to be subject to Brussels but independent of England, but she wants to keep the £ sterling.  What sort of mishmash is that?  She is a feisty young lady, but logic is hardly her strong suit.

Others get hung up on the immigration issue.  Those poor immigrants, risking their lives and trudging through Europe  for pity’s sake, help them!  Of course, no question!

But that is not the question.  The question is, “Does our Parliament decide on the question of immigration or does the EU?  Does our government, however bad or good, govern our country, or have we surrendered to the EU?”

That is the crux.  We are either a puppet state with a puppet prime minister and a puppet parliament, or we are a sovereign state under the Crown.  There are arguments both ways, but one way is treason.