Six magic words for Donald Trump

Whoever came up with Donald Trump's reverberating campaign theme about making America great again hit a nerve with mainstream Americans, and it has served the campaign well.  Mocked and ridiculed in the mainstream media, which is never to be equated with mainstream America, making America great again is a theme that can be appreciated not only by those who have had the misfortune to be personally affected by the decline in this country's manufacturing base or its technical jobs being shipped offshore to third-world wage-savers, but also by those millions of Americans who stand and watch as their very own president, supported by his lockstep-marching Democratic Party and their adoring mainstream media, takes every opportunity to demean our country before the world.  So yes, "make America great again" resonates across this great country and among the millions of citizens out there who want the leadership to make that happen.

But if Donald Trump wants to hit the red-hot nerve that runs through those tens, maybe hundreds, of millions, he simply needs to adopt as his secondary campaign theme the words he recently spoke, "I refuse to be politically correct." The pundits can pontificate all they want about the number one election issue being the economy but I think they are as wrong about that as they have been about every other aspect of this election season. Too comfortably ensconced in their politically correct bastions of elitism to have any idea of what is important to those hundreds of millions of ordinary folks struggling to make a living between their coastal havens, they are no determiners of truly correct political thought and speech.

It's that last term, politically correct speech, that more than any other can be counted on to elicit angry responses from virtually any gathering of citizens who have come together to hear Donald Trump speak.  Yes, they are angry that a clueless and incompetent federal government has allowed their jobs to be taken away, but what really riles them to the boiling point is for some effete liberal academic, bureaucrat, or media fool to tell them, "You can't say that!"  The natural response in most of America is, "The hell I can't!" with a jaw jutted forward and fists tightly bunched at the sides.

That is the vein of fed up, righteous anger that Donald Trump should feed into, starting every speech with, "What you're gonna hear today isn't gonna be politically correct!" and ending it with, "We're gonna make America great again, and a great America is sure as hell not a politically correct America.  We're gonna make America the land of free speech again!"

You do that, Donald, and I promise you, son, you ain't seen nothin' yet. 

Whoever came up with Donald Trump's reverberating campaign theme about making America great again hit a nerve with mainstream Americans, and it has served the campaign well.  Mocked and ridiculed in the mainstream media, which is never to be equated with mainstream America, making America great again is a theme that can be appreciated not only by those who have had the misfortune to be personally affected by the decline in this country's manufacturing base or its technical jobs being shipped offshore to third-world wage-savers, but also by those millions of Americans who stand and watch as their very own president, supported by his lockstep-marching Democratic Party and their adoring mainstream media, takes every opportunity to demean our country before the world.  So yes, "make America great again" resonates across this great country and among the millions of citizens out there who want the leadership to make that happen.

But if Donald Trump wants to hit the red-hot nerve that runs through those tens, maybe hundreds, of millions, he simply needs to adopt as his secondary campaign theme the words he recently spoke, "I refuse to be politically correct." The pundits can pontificate all they want about the number one election issue being the economy but I think they are as wrong about that as they have been about every other aspect of this election season. Too comfortably ensconced in their politically correct bastions of elitism to have any idea of what is important to those hundreds of millions of ordinary folks struggling to make a living between their coastal havens, they are no determiners of truly correct political thought and speech.

It's that last term, politically correct speech, that more than any other can be counted on to elicit angry responses from virtually any gathering of citizens who have come together to hear Donald Trump speak.  Yes, they are angry that a clueless and incompetent federal government has allowed their jobs to be taken away, but what really riles them to the boiling point is for some effete liberal academic, bureaucrat, or media fool to tell them, "You can't say that!"  The natural response in most of America is, "The hell I can't!" with a jaw jutted forward and fists tightly bunched at the sides.

That is the vein of fed up, righteous anger that Donald Trump should feed into, starting every speech with, "What you're gonna hear today isn't gonna be politically correct!" and ending it with, "We're gonna make America great again, and a great America is sure as hell not a politically correct America.  We're gonna make America the land of free speech again!"

You do that, Donald, and I promise you, son, you ain't seen nothin' yet.