How Trump plans an event

In Donald Trump's interaction with reporters on Wednesday, this took place.

The call showed the extraordinary role Trump has taken in his campaign, often acting as his own political strategist, communications adviser, and even scheduler. During an interview on Wednesday in his office, he said he would give a speech on Monday to attack Hillary Clinton, the presumptive Democratic nominee. The event planning then played out in front of reporters.

“I don't even know where yet. I think we are gonna do it in Washington at the club,” Trump said about delivering the speech at Trump National Golf Course in suburban Virginia. “Let's do it at the club,” he said, turning to Hope Hicks, his top press aide. “I wouldn't mind doing it on the Potomac.”

“I almost would love to do it right at the flag,” Trump said.

“I love that,” Hicks told him.

People assume that Trump means this flag, which is between the 14th and 15th holes at the Virginia golf course. 

That Trump's top press aide had no issue with her boss's suggestion is not a good sign.  That's because there are some problems with the plaque.  The history of this part of Virginia is heavily documented, and there is zero evidence of either a battle at this site or of the name "River of Blood."  Multiple sources have called this plaque a complete fabrication.  Nor did Trump preserve the site.  The original topography has been extensively altered to create a golf course, and Trump had hundreds of trees cut down to create vistas of the river from the fairways.  That is blasphemy for historic preservationists.

Trump's earlier reaction at being caught in a fabrication was typical.

Trump told the Times that “numerous historians” had told him that the golf club site had been known as the “River of Blood.” He said he did not remember their names, and he declined to identify any of his staffers who might know the historians’ names.

“How would they know that?” Trump asked when he was told local historians had questioned the veracity of the plaque. “Were they there?”

This story about Trump's phony historic site was splattered across the internet last November.  Now he wants to draw more attention to his core unfamiliarity by holding a major speech in the site.

In Donald Trump's interaction with reporters on Wednesday, this took place.

The call showed the extraordinary role Trump has taken in his campaign, often acting as his own political strategist, communications adviser, and even scheduler. During an interview on Wednesday in his office, he said he would give a speech on Monday to attack Hillary Clinton, the presumptive Democratic nominee. The event planning then played out in front of reporters.

“I don't even know where yet. I think we are gonna do it in Washington at the club,” Trump said about delivering the speech at Trump National Golf Course in suburban Virginia. “Let's do it at the club,” he said, turning to Hope Hicks, his top press aide. “I wouldn't mind doing it on the Potomac.”

“I almost would love to do it right at the flag,” Trump said.

“I love that,” Hicks told him.

People assume that Trump means this flag, which is between the 14th and 15th holes at the Virginia golf course. 

That Trump's top press aide had no issue with her boss's suggestion is not a good sign.  That's because there are some problems with the plaque.  The history of this part of Virginia is heavily documented, and there is zero evidence of either a battle at this site or of the name "River of Blood."  Multiple sources have called this plaque a complete fabrication.  Nor did Trump preserve the site.  The original topography has been extensively altered to create a golf course, and Trump had hundreds of trees cut down to create vistas of the river from the fairways.  That is blasphemy for historic preservationists.

Trump's earlier reaction at being caught in a fabrication was typical.

Trump told the Times that “numerous historians” had told him that the golf club site had been known as the “River of Blood.” He said he did not remember their names, and he declined to identify any of his staffers who might know the historians’ names.

“How would they know that?” Trump asked when he was told local historians had questioned the veracity of the plaque. “Were they there?”

This story about Trump's phony historic site was splattered across the internet last November.  Now he wants to draw more attention to his core unfamiliarity by holding a major speech in the site.