Clinton backtracks on ‘No individual too big to jail’

Hillary Clinton didn’t even wait for the ballots to be tallied before she began betraying those few people who voted for her in New Hampshire.

In the run-up to the New Hampshire primary Clinton declared that “No bank is too big to fail, and no individual is too big to jail.” Despite that pledge to New Hampshire voters, Hillary changed her tune during her concession speech Tuesday night, saying “no executive too powerful to jail.”

Clinton, no doubt, was reacting to widespread commentary that her earlier declaration could actually be applied to, well, you know, uh … her.

And Clinton’s change in wording -- Lord, how those Clintons love to parse words -- followed by less than 48 hours release of an FBI letter confirming that it is investigating Clinton’s use of a private email server as secretary of state.

While the change in wording may seem picayune, it is nonetheless a tell. Despite their protestations that there’s no there there, the Clinton camp realizes that many in the public wonder if her “no individual is too big to jail” description applies to her, considering the many instances in which a lesser figure might have been jailed: Whitewater; her miraculous cattle futures profits; long-sought Rose Law Firm billing records mysteriously showing up in the White House; the handling of the suicide of Vince Foster.

We’ll stop there for the sake of brevity

Her declaration that no individual is too big to jail simply hit too close to home for Clinton. Therefor the use of the word, executive, in her most recent iteration.

My guess, with the FBI investigation looming, is that by the time she hits South Carolina Hillary will have changed the line even further, morphing into ‘No Wall Street executive is too big to jail.’

After all, as secretary of state Hillary was an executive, too.

Hillary Clinton didn’t even wait for the ballots to be tallied before she began betraying those few people who voted for her in New Hampshire.

In the run-up to the New Hampshire primary Clinton declared that “No bank is too big to fail, and no individual is too big to jail.” Despite that pledge to New Hampshire voters, Hillary changed her tune during her concession speech Tuesday night, saying “no executive too powerful to jail.”

Clinton, no doubt, was reacting to widespread commentary that her earlier declaration could actually be applied to, well, you know, uh … her.

And Clinton’s change in wording -- Lord, how those Clintons love to parse words -- followed by less than 48 hours release of an FBI letter confirming that it is investigating Clinton’s use of a private email server as secretary of state.

While the change in wording may seem picayune, it is nonetheless a tell. Despite their protestations that there’s no there there, the Clinton camp realizes that many in the public wonder if her “no individual is too big to jail” description applies to her, considering the many instances in which a lesser figure might have been jailed: Whitewater; her miraculous cattle futures profits; long-sought Rose Law Firm billing records mysteriously showing up in the White House; the handling of the suicide of Vince Foster.

We’ll stop there for the sake of brevity

Her declaration that no individual is too big to jail simply hit too close to home for Clinton. Therefor the use of the word, executive, in her most recent iteration.

My guess, with the FBI investigation looming, is that by the time she hits South Carolina Hillary will have changed the line even further, morphing into ‘No Wall Street executive is too big to jail.’

After all, as secretary of state Hillary was an executive, too.