Trump, Immigration, and the GOP Elite

While I  object to the plan which calls on the removal of all illegal immigrants, I cannot stand how the establishment types of the Republican Party insult the intelligence of the public when it comes to Trump's plan to remove the 11 million.

One Republican operative tweeted that the U.S. will need a “police state” to do it. George Will, writing for the NRO, says that the 11 million is 94 times the 117,000 Japanese rounded up by FDR. Will even went so far as to suggest that these deportations are against the spirit of limited government.

But here are some facts:

1) The U.S. deported 386,473 immigrants in each of the first four years of the Obama administration. Basically, in four years Obama removed 13 times more illegal immigrants -- including criminals -- than all the arrests by FDR of legal Japanese Americans/immigrants, and few people even noticed.

2) In the ten years starting with 2004, ICE deported a total of 3.3 million immigrants. Half of those were "interior arrests"; meaning the immigrants were picked up while already deep into the United States. The streets of America hardly looked like a "police state" when this took place.

3) Annual deportation levels are now more than double than during the second term of Bill Clinton, and it is tenfold the poor 39,000 annual deportations of the first five years of the 1990s. Doubling the deportation levels from the current levels is within reach and would take only a decade to remove 11 million; many of which -- here on expired visas -- would leave on their own if a fair, reentry system is set-up.

4) ICE has a budget of $6 billion. Doubling it to $12 billion to assure a doubling of deportations is hardly against the grain of limited government. Besides, the cost of illegal immigration is much higher for the federal government than the cost of deportations.

George Stephanopoulos said Sunday while interviewing Trump that removing 11 million people would cost the U.S. economy $1.3 trillion (annually), but this too is false on three points:

A) The South American countries have 65 million more people than the U.S. but have a joint economy only a third the size of the United States. More people, obviously, does not translate into a booming economy. 

B) Perhaps Clinton's former optative referred to how 11 million less workers would affect the U.S. economy, but the math wrongly assumes that all 11 million illegal immigrants are workers. It also wrongly assumes that some of the millions of working-age Americans who left the workforce in recent years will continue to sit on the sidelined even as jobs (vacated by illegal immigrants) would now become available for them; probably at better pay.

C) If a larger population translates into a larger economy, then Stephanopoulos should call on increasing immigration from Eastern European countries. There are plenty of people there who deserve to immigrate into the U.S. for a better life. But he won't support it because these immigrants tend to vote Republican...   

Again, I do not agree with Trump's mass deportation promises. However, I also don't agree with how the Establishment-RINO wing of the GOP and the hacks in media dumb down the conversation.

While I  object to the plan which calls on the removal of all illegal immigrants, I cannot stand how the establishment types of the Republican Party insult the intelligence of the public when it comes to Trump's plan to remove the 11 million.

One Republican operative tweeted that the U.S. will need a “police state” to do it. George Will, writing for the NRO, says that the 11 million is 94 times the 117,000 Japanese rounded up by FDR. Will even went so far as to suggest that these deportations are against the spirit of limited government.

But here are some facts:

1) The U.S. deported 386,473 immigrants in each of the first four years of the Obama administration. Basically, in four years Obama removed 13 times more illegal immigrants -- including criminals -- than all the arrests by FDR of legal Japanese Americans/immigrants, and few people even noticed.

2) In the ten years starting with 2004, ICE deported a total of 3.3 million immigrants. Half of those were "interior arrests"; meaning the immigrants were picked up while already deep into the United States. The streets of America hardly looked like a "police state" when this took place.

3) Annual deportation levels are now more than double than during the second term of Bill Clinton, and it is tenfold the poor 39,000 annual deportations of the first five years of the 1990s. Doubling the deportation levels from the current levels is within reach and would take only a decade to remove 11 million; many of which -- here on expired visas -- would leave on their own if a fair, reentry system is set-up.

4) ICE has a budget of $6 billion. Doubling it to $12 billion to assure a doubling of deportations is hardly against the grain of limited government. Besides, the cost of illegal immigration is much higher for the federal government than the cost of deportations.

George Stephanopoulos said Sunday while interviewing Trump that removing 11 million people would cost the U.S. economy $1.3 trillion (annually), but this too is false on three points:

A) The South American countries have 65 million more people than the U.S. but have a joint economy only a third the size of the United States. More people, obviously, does not translate into a booming economy. 

B) Perhaps Clinton's former optative referred to how 11 million less workers would affect the U.S. economy, but the math wrongly assumes that all 11 million illegal immigrants are workers. It also wrongly assumes that some of the millions of working-age Americans who left the workforce in recent years will continue to sit on the sidelined even as jobs (vacated by illegal immigrants) would now become available for them; probably at better pay.

C) If a larger population translates into a larger economy, then Stephanopoulos should call on increasing immigration from Eastern European countries. There are plenty of people there who deserve to immigrate into the U.S. for a better life. But he won't support it because these immigrants tend to vote Republican...   

Again, I do not agree with Trump's mass deportation promises. However, I also don't agree with how the Establishment-RINO wing of the GOP and the hacks in media dumb down the conversation.