Mexico fights for rights of 'anchor babies'

Mexican cultural imperialists and their leftist allies have long dreamed of a Reconquista – retaking America's Southwest on behalf of Mexico.  They have sought for decades to use illegal immigration and birthright citizenship to remake a vast corner of America – Texas, New Mexico, Arizona, and California – in the image of Mexico.

Now, a court battle is heating up in Texas that revolves around a Texas agency's refusal to grant birth certificates to illegal immigrants with children born in Texas.  As the Austin-American Statesman reports:

In a rare move, the Mexican Ministry of Foreign Affairs filed an amicus curiae brief late Monday in a lawsuit filed by four women whose children have been denied birth certificates by the Texas Department of State Health Services because of the mothers’ legal status in the country.

In the last year, officials in the Vital Statistics Unit of the department have denied parents who are in the country without authorization birth certificates for their children and have told these parents that they will not accept their “matriculas consulares” — photo identification cards issued by Mexican Consulates in the United States to Mexicans living in the country — or foreign passports without a current visa.

The lawsuit, filed in May, includes Mexican, Honduran and Guatemalan plaintiffs suing the department for what they allege is constitutional discrimination and interference in the federal government’s authority over immigration.

“This policy puts the newly born children of undocumented people in a state of drastic vulnerability,” the Mexican Ministry of Foreign Affairs said in a news release issued Monday. “It violates the right to an identity guaranteed by international human rights protocols and blocks their access to basic services like health and education.”

As this case moves through the courts, it will no doubt overshadow an election campaign that – thanks to Donald Trump – has put illegal immigration and birthright citizenship at the forefront of a testy public debate.

"You either have a country or you don't," Trump said recently.  That observation – a reference to America's sovereignty – is especially timely, given that Mexico's legal arguments are, in part, based on "international human rights protocols."  The irony here is that these high-minded protocols in fact serve the cynical purposes of Mexico's politicians and economic elites.  Specifically, they give them cover to realize their dream of a Reconquista that expands their influence in America at the expense of its sovereignty – and its culture.

Interestingly, Mexico's legal action also challenges Texas officials who, it seems, believe that Mexican counselor officials have played them for fools by readily issuing identity documents to Mexicans residing illegally in Texas.  Specifically, Texas's Department of State Health Services says it has refused to recognize those identity papers “because the documents used to obtain the ‘matricula’ are not verified by the issuing party,” according to the Statesman.

Mexico's ministry, for its part, was quoted as saying, “We want to assure the recognition of (Mexican) passports and consular identifications as legitimate documents that should be enough to attest to the nationality and identity of their carriers.”

Mexico has for decades encouraged citizens of its lowest social classes – including millions of poor and uneducated members of its peasant class – to head to the U.S. illegally.  By doing this, Mexico achieves two goals: it rids itself of a vexing social problem, and it generates a staggering transfer of wealth from the U.S. back to Mexico – some $20 billion annually – as illegal immigrants send money back to relatives.  It's a win-win for Mexico.

Mexico's cynicism is boundless.  It has protested to international courts when its citizens were convicted in high-profile death penalty cases.  Yet it can be counted on to avoid financial or moral responsibility for its citizens who fuel America's crime wave and who are draining social service programs – from bankrupting hospital emergency rooms to utilizing benefits for anchor babies.

Ordinary Americans have grown increasingly outraged over what's happening in their communities.  The latest small town to head toward a Latino majority is the tiny city of Jerome, Idaho – where Hispanics now outnumber whites in the school system, according to a recent item in a newspaper in Twin Falls.

None of this is about human rights.  Rather, it's about the cynical way that Mexico and its leftist allies have played American politicians for chumps as they endeavor to enhance their own power and ideological agenda.

No wonder Donald Trump is soaring in the polls as he declares that Mexico – not the U.S. – will pay for a wall on Mexico's northern border.

Trump may be undiplomatic.  But he's no chump.

Mexican cultural imperialists and their leftist allies have long dreamed of a Reconquista – retaking America's Southwest on behalf of Mexico.  They have sought for decades to use illegal immigration and birthright citizenship to remake a vast corner of America – Texas, New Mexico, Arizona, and California – in the image of Mexico.

Now, a court battle is heating up in Texas that revolves around a Texas agency's refusal to grant birth certificates to illegal immigrants with children born in Texas.  As the Austin-American Statesman reports:

In a rare move, the Mexican Ministry of Foreign Affairs filed an amicus curiae brief late Monday in a lawsuit filed by four women whose children have been denied birth certificates by the Texas Department of State Health Services because of the mothers’ legal status in the country.

In the last year, officials in the Vital Statistics Unit of the department have denied parents who are in the country without authorization birth certificates for their children and have told these parents that they will not accept their “matriculas consulares” — photo identification cards issued by Mexican Consulates in the United States to Mexicans living in the country — or foreign passports without a current visa.

The lawsuit, filed in May, includes Mexican, Honduran and Guatemalan plaintiffs suing the department for what they allege is constitutional discrimination and interference in the federal government’s authority over immigration.

“This policy puts the newly born children of undocumented people in a state of drastic vulnerability,” the Mexican Ministry of Foreign Affairs said in a news release issued Monday. “It violates the right to an identity guaranteed by international human rights protocols and blocks their access to basic services like health and education.”

As this case moves through the courts, it will no doubt overshadow an election campaign that – thanks to Donald Trump – has put illegal immigration and birthright citizenship at the forefront of a testy public debate.

"You either have a country or you don't," Trump said recently.  That observation – a reference to America's sovereignty – is especially timely, given that Mexico's legal arguments are, in part, based on "international human rights protocols."  The irony here is that these high-minded protocols in fact serve the cynical purposes of Mexico's politicians and economic elites.  Specifically, they give them cover to realize their dream of a Reconquista that expands their influence in America at the expense of its sovereignty – and its culture.

Interestingly, Mexico's legal action also challenges Texas officials who, it seems, believe that Mexican counselor officials have played them for fools by readily issuing identity documents to Mexicans residing illegally in Texas.  Specifically, Texas's Department of State Health Services says it has refused to recognize those identity papers “because the documents used to obtain the ‘matricula’ are not verified by the issuing party,” according to the Statesman.

Mexico's ministry, for its part, was quoted as saying, “We want to assure the recognition of (Mexican) passports and consular identifications as legitimate documents that should be enough to attest to the nationality and identity of their carriers.”

Mexico has for decades encouraged citizens of its lowest social classes – including millions of poor and uneducated members of its peasant class – to head to the U.S. illegally.  By doing this, Mexico achieves two goals: it rids itself of a vexing social problem, and it generates a staggering transfer of wealth from the U.S. back to Mexico – some $20 billion annually – as illegal immigrants send money back to relatives.  It's a win-win for Mexico.

Mexico's cynicism is boundless.  It has protested to international courts when its citizens were convicted in high-profile death penalty cases.  Yet it can be counted on to avoid financial or moral responsibility for its citizens who fuel America's crime wave and who are draining social service programs – from bankrupting hospital emergency rooms to utilizing benefits for anchor babies.

Ordinary Americans have grown increasingly outraged over what's happening in their communities.  The latest small town to head toward a Latino majority is the tiny city of Jerome, Idaho – where Hispanics now outnumber whites in the school system, according to a recent item in a newspaper in Twin Falls.

None of this is about human rights.  Rather, it's about the cynical way that Mexico and its leftist allies have played American politicians for chumps as they endeavor to enhance their own power and ideological agenda.

No wonder Donald Trump is soaring in the polls as he declares that Mexico – not the U.S. – will pay for a wall on Mexico's northern border.

Trump may be undiplomatic.  But he's no chump.