2016: I think that there are more surprises ahead for Democrats

Democrats are having a little civil war about the direction of the party.  On one hand, you have Senator Sanders pushing the party to the left.    

On the other hand, you have a lot of Democrats between New York City and San Francisco wondering about the future of the party.   

Then there is Mr. O'Malley, who is demanding debates!  He may have finally found his voice, as my friend Barry Casselman writes.

The Democrats have been here before.

The Democrats' party war did not start with Sanders or O'Malley.  It was clearly evident in 2000, when 2.8 million voted for Mr. Nader, a protest vote against the so-called centrist Clinton policies. 

One of those liberals who opposed Gore was a fellow named Michael Moore, who blasted the Clinton-Gore economy.

The internal party war was put off by the the Florida recount.  Add the Iraq War, and the left had a lot to hate Bush about.  The party would have exploded if VP Gore had pulled off the 2000 election, especially if he had invaded Iraq, as I think that he would have after 9/11.

In 2016, they won't have Bush to complain about, although some will.  They have the Obama record, a wimpy economy, and a foreign policy that no one loves, unless you are an Obama cultist first class!

Mr. Sanders keeps going around talking about the lousy economy and landscape for the middle class.  Can someone whisper in Mr. Sanders's ear that he's talking about the Obama years?  Ditto Governor O'Malley.

What will 2016 be like for Democrats?  Will it be more like 2008 or 1968?  My guess is that it will be more like '68 as we see the left go for the party's throat and potentially lead it to an electoral disaster.

Ironically, some of the people running for president, or contemplating a run, are old enough to be part of that generation of 1968.  

P.S. You can listen to my show (Canto Talk) and follow me on Twitter.

Democrats are having a little civil war about the direction of the party.  On one hand, you have Senator Sanders pushing the party to the left.    

On the other hand, you have a lot of Democrats between New York City and San Francisco wondering about the future of the party.   

Then there is Mr. O'Malley, who is demanding debates!  He may have finally found his voice, as my friend Barry Casselman writes.

The Democrats have been here before.

The Democrats' party war did not start with Sanders or O'Malley.  It was clearly evident in 2000, when 2.8 million voted for Mr. Nader, a protest vote against the so-called centrist Clinton policies. 

One of those liberals who opposed Gore was a fellow named Michael Moore, who blasted the Clinton-Gore economy.

The internal party war was put off by the the Florida recount.  Add the Iraq War, and the left had a lot to hate Bush about.  The party would have exploded if VP Gore had pulled off the 2000 election, especially if he had invaded Iraq, as I think that he would have after 9/11.

In 2016, they won't have Bush to complain about, although some will.  They have the Obama record, a wimpy economy, and a foreign policy that no one loves, unless you are an Obama cultist first class!

Mr. Sanders keeps going around talking about the lousy economy and landscape for the middle class.  Can someone whisper in Mr. Sanders's ear that he's talking about the Obama years?  Ditto Governor O'Malley.

What will 2016 be like for Democrats?  Will it be more like 2008 or 1968?  My guess is that it will be more like '68 as we see the left go for the party's throat and potentially lead it to an electoral disaster.

Ironically, some of the people running for president, or contemplating a run, are old enough to be part of that generation of 1968.  

P.S. You can listen to my show (Canto Talk) and follow me on Twitter.