Two Mexicans have killed immigration reform in the U.S.

Having a bad day?  You could be President Peña-Nieto of Mexico, a man we've praised before for fighting to reform the energy sector and the corrupt teachers' union.

For a couple of years, President Peña-Nieto had assured Mexicans that his administration has been arresting and killing cartel leaders.  To be fair, the Mexican army have scored some big hits on the cartels.

He probably wishes that his soldiers had killed "El Chapo" rather than capture him.  A dead Chapo would not have escaped.

Just spoke with an old friend in Mexico, and the outrage is amazing.  

My friend said: "I knew that we were corrupt, but this is really corruption."

He added something rather scary: can President Peña-Nieto trust the people protecting him and family?

It's a very bad day for President Peña-Nieto, as we can read all over the world:

The telegenic president’s “kingpin strategy” has not succeeded in ending rampant drug-war violence across the country, but it has at least offered the government a string of high-profile captures – and in the rogue’s gallery of arrests, El Chapo was the jewel in the crown.

“Whichever way you look at it, this is very bad,” political analyst and former head of the Mexican intelligence agency Guillermo Valdés told the Guardian. “It is going to be very hard to remove the indelible mark this has made on the government’s public and historical image.”

Valdés said he believed it unlikely that the manhunt launched to track down El Chapo will be successful, unless the infamous leader of the powerful Sinaloa cartel makes a stupid mistake or the government gets very lucky.

The Mexican government must be all too aware of the precedent set by another boss of Guzmán’s Sinaloa cartel, Rafael Caro Quintero. He was sentenced to 40 years in jail for his part in a string of murders, including that of a DEA agent, but to the fury of the US government, he was released from jail in 2013 on a legal technicality – and promptly disappeared. He is now believed to have rebuilt his power base in the rugged mountains of Sinaloa.

Even if Mexican forces manage to recapture Guzmán, it is unlikely that it would fully undo the damage wrought by his escape 16 months after his arrest – and 14 years after he first absconded from high-security jail.

In one week, two Mexicans have singlehandedly killed any chance for immigration reform in the U.S.  It wasn't great before, but it is zero today.

In San Francisco, an illegal immigrant killed a young woman walking with her father.  

Outside Mexico City, a cartel leader has confirmed that Mexico is in over its head in dealing with the gangs and the violence.  It's obvious that Mexico won't be much of a partner in closing the border. 

Immigration reform will continue to be a talking point in Democrats' speeches, and maybe even some Republicans'.  Nevertheless, the issue is over because of El Chapo and Mr. Sanchez in San Francisco. 

P.S. You can listen to my show (Canto Talk) and follow me on Twitter.

Having a bad day?  You could be President Peña-Nieto of Mexico, a man we've praised before for fighting to reform the energy sector and the corrupt teachers' union.

For a couple of years, President Peña-Nieto had assured Mexicans that his administration has been arresting and killing cartel leaders.  To be fair, the Mexican army have scored some big hits on the cartels.

He probably wishes that his soldiers had killed "El Chapo" rather than capture him.  A dead Chapo would not have escaped.

Just spoke with an old friend in Mexico, and the outrage is amazing.  

My friend said: "I knew that we were corrupt, but this is really corruption."

He added something rather scary: can President Peña-Nieto trust the people protecting him and family?

It's a very bad day for President Peña-Nieto, as we can read all over the world:

The telegenic president’s “kingpin strategy” has not succeeded in ending rampant drug-war violence across the country, but it has at least offered the government a string of high-profile captures – and in the rogue’s gallery of arrests, El Chapo was the jewel in the crown.

“Whichever way you look at it, this is very bad,” political analyst and former head of the Mexican intelligence agency Guillermo Valdés told the Guardian. “It is going to be very hard to remove the indelible mark this has made on the government’s public and historical image.”

Valdés said he believed it unlikely that the manhunt launched to track down El Chapo will be successful, unless the infamous leader of the powerful Sinaloa cartel makes a stupid mistake or the government gets very lucky.

The Mexican government must be all too aware of the precedent set by another boss of Guzmán’s Sinaloa cartel, Rafael Caro Quintero. He was sentenced to 40 years in jail for his part in a string of murders, including that of a DEA agent, but to the fury of the US government, he was released from jail in 2013 on a legal technicality – and promptly disappeared. He is now believed to have rebuilt his power base in the rugged mountains of Sinaloa.

Even if Mexican forces manage to recapture Guzmán, it is unlikely that it would fully undo the damage wrought by his escape 16 months after his arrest – and 14 years after he first absconded from high-security jail.

In one week, two Mexicans have singlehandedly killed any chance for immigration reform in the U.S.  It wasn't great before, but it is zero today.

In San Francisco, an illegal immigrant killed a young woman walking with her father.  

Outside Mexico City, a cartel leader has confirmed that Mexico is in over its head in dealing with the gangs and the violence.  It's obvious that Mexico won't be much of a partner in closing the border. 

Immigration reform will continue to be a talking point in Democrats' speeches, and maybe even some Republicans'.  Nevertheless, the issue is over because of El Chapo and Mr. Sanchez in San Francisco. 

P.S. You can listen to my show (Canto Talk) and follow me on Twitter.