The latest amenity in luxury NYC housing: panic rooms

According to liberals, New York City is the most wonderful place to live on the Earth, the finest example of culture that exists in the known world.  That's why it's interesting to read the latest developments in the NYC housing market.  Most recently it's the development of safe rooms, also sometimes called panic rooms.

Panic rooms are reinforced rooms in homes (or condos) where residents can hide from burglars and robbers who break into their homes.  Formerly the providence of a handful of super-wealthy people who live in large mansions, they are now gaining popularity in the trendy boroughs of New York City.

“The world is a very scary place right now, especially for people of means; they feel cornered and threatened,” said Tom Gaffney, the president of Gaffco Ballistics, which has installed a number of safe rooms around New York City. “When you have so much to lose, and you can afford to, you put a premium on your safety.” Mr. Gaffney said his business had more than doubled over the past decade for systems that cost five or six figures

Alan Wilzig, the former chief executive of the Trust Company of New Jersey, said that when he bought a TriBeCa townhouse in 2003, the bank’s security staff wanted it fortified.

The 40-foot-wide, two-story property is crisscrossed with video cameras and motion detectors, but should a threat become serious, Mr. Wilzig; his wife, Karin; and two children can retreat to the master bedroom, behind a door that weighs 1,488 pounds. A peephole offers a 180-degree view of the hallway outside, a critical feature, Mr. Wilzig said: “It can be just as important to know when it’s safe outside to be safe inside.”

Inside the master bedroom, everything seems normal. The windows look like the typical two-pane variety, and they are, except for a transparent bulletproof polymer, which at the time was cutting edge. (Now, similar technology can be found in scratch resistant cellphone screen covers.) Kevlar and steel are just behind the drywall.

So let's count the ironies here:

1) Liberals love to live in New York City, which is filled with dangerous crime.  It's one of the few cities in the world where you can find dangerous housing projects circling multimillion-dollar condos.  I wrote just a few weeks ago about multimillion-dollar Trump condos on the edge of Manhattan that were virtually encircled by dangerous housing projects.

2) Because Manhattan isn't car-friendly, even the richest of New Yorkers have to walk on the streets from time to time, making themselves available for involuntary redistribution (and perhaps a whack in the head as an added bonus).  Imagine an African prairie where the zebras have to walk over a narrow strip of land every day past the lions to get to the watering hole.  That's what it's like in New York: a lawless, carless society where people are forced to be defenseless targets of opportunity.

3) After years of releasing "low-level" offenders and emptying the mental hospitals, New Yorkers pat themselves on the back when less than 400 people are killed every year and thousands more are shot and beaten up (but most of the shootings and beatings aren't at the hands of racist police, so I am not sure if that counts).

4) If New York had more relaxed gun laws, people could protect themselves and wouldn't need vaults to lock themselves into.

I love reading articles about NYC; culturally speaking, it's like reading articles about the bow of the Titanic.

This article was produced by NewsMachete.com, the conservative news site.

According to liberals, New York City is the most wonderful place to live on the Earth, the finest example of culture that exists in the known world.  That's why it's interesting to read the latest developments in the NYC housing market.  Most recently it's the development of safe rooms, also sometimes called panic rooms.

Panic rooms are reinforced rooms in homes (or condos) where residents can hide from burglars and robbers who break into their homes.  Formerly the providence of a handful of super-wealthy people who live in large mansions, they are now gaining popularity in the trendy boroughs of New York City.

“The world is a very scary place right now, especially for people of means; they feel cornered and threatened,” said Tom Gaffney, the president of Gaffco Ballistics, which has installed a number of safe rooms around New York City. “When you have so much to lose, and you can afford to, you put a premium on your safety.” Mr. Gaffney said his business had more than doubled over the past decade for systems that cost five or six figures

Alan Wilzig, the former chief executive of the Trust Company of New Jersey, said that when he bought a TriBeCa townhouse in 2003, the bank’s security staff wanted it fortified.

The 40-foot-wide, two-story property is crisscrossed with video cameras and motion detectors, but should a threat become serious, Mr. Wilzig; his wife, Karin; and two children can retreat to the master bedroom, behind a door that weighs 1,488 pounds. A peephole offers a 180-degree view of the hallway outside, a critical feature, Mr. Wilzig said: “It can be just as important to know when it’s safe outside to be safe inside.”

Inside the master bedroom, everything seems normal. The windows look like the typical two-pane variety, and they are, except for a transparent bulletproof polymer, which at the time was cutting edge. (Now, similar technology can be found in scratch resistant cellphone screen covers.) Kevlar and steel are just behind the drywall.

So let's count the ironies here:

1) Liberals love to live in New York City, which is filled with dangerous crime.  It's one of the few cities in the world where you can find dangerous housing projects circling multimillion-dollar condos.  I wrote just a few weeks ago about multimillion-dollar Trump condos on the edge of Manhattan that were virtually encircled by dangerous housing projects.

2) Because Manhattan isn't car-friendly, even the richest of New Yorkers have to walk on the streets from time to time, making themselves available for involuntary redistribution (and perhaps a whack in the head as an added bonus).  Imagine an African prairie where the zebras have to walk over a narrow strip of land every day past the lions to get to the watering hole.  That's what it's like in New York: a lawless, carless society where people are forced to be defenseless targets of opportunity.

3) After years of releasing "low-level" offenders and emptying the mental hospitals, New Yorkers pat themselves on the back when less than 400 people are killed every year and thousands more are shot and beaten up (but most of the shootings and beatings aren't at the hands of racist police, so I am not sure if that counts).

4) If New York had more relaxed gun laws, people could protect themselves and wouldn't need vaults to lock themselves into.

I love reading articles about NYC; culturally speaking, it's like reading articles about the bow of the Titanic.

This article was produced by NewsMachete.com, the conservative news site.