The British election according to Katty Kay

The leftism of Katty Kay is insidious.  Kay, lead anchor of the BBC and sometime guest on American political shows like Meet the Press, has been long accustomed to giving her unsolicited prognosticating on our affairs to the American public.  Now she has a chance to inform American viewers of events across the pond, clearly relishing this opportunity with her usual rancor towards all things conservative. 

Regarding David Cameron’s Tory party’s excellent win, which lets him remain prime minister with a majority in parliament, Kay opined on an otherwise reasonable panel of Morning Joe Friday morning: “If I’m in the White House, and I’m looking at that special relationship, I’m looking at a relationship with a very diminished partner.”  This is based on her analysis that the strengthened Scottish National Party threatens the unity of the United Kingdom, indicating the possible re-emergence of the Scottish secessionist movement.  So the Conservatives’ gaining seats and votes, in this contorted view, equals a diminishment.  Interesting.  Tell me more, Katty.

You see, it was not really a victory for Cameron:  “It was as much a vote to keep the SNP out of government, as it was for the Tory party.”  This Kay refers to as “strategic voting,” which is supposedly typical of the British electorate.  They fear a Labour/SNP coalition, in this theory.  “It’s not as though the British public woke and said, Wow, we really love David Cameron,” she added with her usual snark.  Wouldn’t some magnanimity be in order here, Ms. Kay?  Your team lost; be gracious.  Certainly Cameron showed such grace in victory toward his opponents.

There could be a grain of truth in Ms. Kay’s analysis vis-à-vis SNP; but then again, how does she have this insight into the hearts and minds of voters?  It’s just as likely that the vote reflected ambivalence about the European Union and its open-borders ways.  Certainly one would imagine there was ambivalence towards the prospect of Ed Miliband as prime minister.

Katty Kay has been lulling us into a false sense of security for far too long with her soothing accent and not unattractive appearance.  Do not be fooled by this beguiling messenger of cultural Marxism.

Malcolm Unwell is a lachrymose chronicler of American gone bad.  Contact him.

The leftism of Katty Kay is insidious.  Kay, lead anchor of the BBC and sometime guest on American political shows like Meet the Press, has been long accustomed to giving her unsolicited prognosticating on our affairs to the American public.  Now she has a chance to inform American viewers of events across the pond, clearly relishing this opportunity with her usual rancor towards all things conservative. 

Regarding David Cameron’s Tory party’s excellent win, which lets him remain prime minister with a majority in parliament, Kay opined on an otherwise reasonable panel of Morning Joe Friday morning: “If I’m in the White House, and I’m looking at that special relationship, I’m looking at a relationship with a very diminished partner.”  This is based on her analysis that the strengthened Scottish National Party threatens the unity of the United Kingdom, indicating the possible re-emergence of the Scottish secessionist movement.  So the Conservatives’ gaining seats and votes, in this contorted view, equals a diminishment.  Interesting.  Tell me more, Katty.

You see, it was not really a victory for Cameron:  “It was as much a vote to keep the SNP out of government, as it was for the Tory party.”  This Kay refers to as “strategic voting,” which is supposedly typical of the British electorate.  They fear a Labour/SNP coalition, in this theory.  “It’s not as though the British public woke and said, Wow, we really love David Cameron,” she added with her usual snark.  Wouldn’t some magnanimity be in order here, Ms. Kay?  Your team lost; be gracious.  Certainly Cameron showed such grace in victory toward his opponents.

There could be a grain of truth in Ms. Kay’s analysis vis-à-vis SNP; but then again, how does she have this insight into the hearts and minds of voters?  It’s just as likely that the vote reflected ambivalence about the European Union and its open-borders ways.  Certainly one would imagine there was ambivalence towards the prospect of Ed Miliband as prime minister.

Katty Kay has been lulling us into a false sense of security for far too long with her soothing accent and not unattractive appearance.  Do not be fooled by this beguiling messenger of cultural Marxism.

Malcolm Unwell is a lachrymose chronicler of American gone bad.  Contact him.