Memorial Day 2015: I remember my late friend Nathan Aguirre

Like most of you, I will enjoy a day off, a cheeseburger, and Josh Hamilton rejoining the Rangers today. 

At the same time, I will take the time to remember the real reason for this day off.

Mackubin Thomas Owens is an associate dean of academics and professor of national security affairs at the Naval War College in Newport and is the editor of Orbis.  He is a Marine infantry veteran of Vietnam.

Let me recommend that you read Mystic Chords of Memory:

This weekend, we mark the 140th anniversary of the first official observation of the holiday we now call Memorial Day, as established by General John A. Logan’s “General Order No. 11” of the Grand Army of the Republic dated 5 May, 1868.

This order reads in part:

“The 30th day of May 1868 is designated for the purpose of strewing with flowers and otherwise decorating the graves of comrades who died in defense of their country during the late rebellion, and whose bodies lie in almost every city, village and hamlet churchyard in the land.”

Logan’s order served to ratify a practice that was already widespread, both in the North and the South, in the years immediately following the Civil War.

Alas, for many Americans today, Memorial Day has come to signify nothing more than another three-day weekend, a mere excuse for a weekend cook-out.

Such an observance of Memorial Day obscures even the vestiges of its intended meaning: a solemn time, serving both as catharsis for those who fought and survived, and to ensure that those who follow will not forget the sacrifice of those who died that the American Republic and the principles that sustain it, might live.

I am not knocking anyone for cooking outdoors or sitting at the pool.  At the same time, take a minute and remember those who served and gave their lives.

In my case, I will remember a young man named Nathan Aguirre who died in Iraq. 

I know Nathan's parents.  His dad and I are church ushers.  His mom is a beautiful person who is now working with other families who have lost sons in Iraq.

Nathan Aguirre is a real hero.  Remember him and his parents today!

P.S. You can hear my show (CantoTalk) or follow me on Twitter.

Like most of you, I will enjoy a day off, a cheeseburger, and Josh Hamilton rejoining the Rangers today. 

At the same time, I will take the time to remember the real reason for this day off.

Mackubin Thomas Owens is an associate dean of academics and professor of national security affairs at the Naval War College in Newport and is the editor of Orbis.  He is a Marine infantry veteran of Vietnam.

Let me recommend that you read Mystic Chords of Memory:

This weekend, we mark the 140th anniversary of the first official observation of the holiday we now call Memorial Day, as established by General John A. Logan’s “General Order No. 11” of the Grand Army of the Republic dated 5 May, 1868.

This order reads in part:

“The 30th day of May 1868 is designated for the purpose of strewing with flowers and otherwise decorating the graves of comrades who died in defense of their country during the late rebellion, and whose bodies lie in almost every city, village and hamlet churchyard in the land.”

Logan’s order served to ratify a practice that was already widespread, both in the North and the South, in the years immediately following the Civil War.

Alas, for many Americans today, Memorial Day has come to signify nothing more than another three-day weekend, a mere excuse for a weekend cook-out.

Such an observance of Memorial Day obscures even the vestiges of its intended meaning: a solemn time, serving both as catharsis for those who fought and survived, and to ensure that those who follow will not forget the sacrifice of those who died that the American Republic and the principles that sustain it, might live.

I am not knocking anyone for cooking outdoors or sitting at the pool.  At the same time, take a minute and remember those who served and gave their lives.

In my case, I will remember a young man named Nathan Aguirre who died in Iraq. 

I know Nathan's parents.  His dad and I are church ushers.  His mom is a beautiful person who is now working with other families who have lost sons in Iraq.

Nathan Aguirre is a real hero.  Remember him and his parents today!

P.S. You can hear my show (CantoTalk) or follow me on Twitter.