Like cattle before a thunderstorm

There is an uneasiness.  As with cattle before a thunderstorm, there is a sense of the impending.

Maybe it is because we all tend to expose ourselves to the same news outlets, the same websites.  Perhaps we are creating our own uneasiness.  The internet and cable TV are actually new to our culture, and the impact of all this information, good and bad, accurate and inaccurate, has yet to be quantified and fully understood.  Are we brainwashing ourselves?

It is good practice to listen to the other news and information outlets in an attempt to balance the input.  It is a tough job and usually fruitless, but one must try. 

The issues of today are remarkable and bothersome.  From the war on police to the urban tinder boxes flaming up across America, the flames seem to be fanned by curious personalities friendly with officials who should, at least, be at arm’s length from such antics.

The nefarious harm us, in some cases captured, prosecuted, sentenced, but seemingly never punished.  Nidal Hasan still draws breath.  Why?  Yet police officers doing their difficult jobs are more vilified than a mass murderer such as Hasan. 

We are told we must close Gitmo because its existence “makes more terrorists.”  Incarcerating those who attempt harm on our nation makes them mad.  So we release them, as an army of 30,000 fanatics pops up in the Middle East and undoes years of American efforts and nation-building. 

China and Japan are our largest creditors.  Two countries that were destitute just 70 years ago.  Our national debt is like a “homesick angel.”  Up and up goes the total as borrowing costs that normally would temper deficit spending are erased by a quasi-agency known as the Federal Reserve, magnificently powerful, yet unelected in a system that boasts representation as its foundation.

Laws on the books are disregarded by those who swore to enforce those laws, the president lies about insurance coverage and attacks on the Benghazi consulate.  Candidates break the law of record-keeping, and it seems to have no effect on the anyone’s popularity.

Attorneys general point to prosecutiorial discretion when they choose not to enforce laws with which they disagree.

There is good cause for the cattle to be nervous.  The ground is moving, and it is already raining.

There is an uneasiness.  As with cattle before a thunderstorm, there is a sense of the impending.

Maybe it is because we all tend to expose ourselves to the same news outlets, the same websites.  Perhaps we are creating our own uneasiness.  The internet and cable TV are actually new to our culture, and the impact of all this information, good and bad, accurate and inaccurate, has yet to be quantified and fully understood.  Are we brainwashing ourselves?

It is good practice to listen to the other news and information outlets in an attempt to balance the input.  It is a tough job and usually fruitless, but one must try. 

The issues of today are remarkable and bothersome.  From the war on police to the urban tinder boxes flaming up across America, the flames seem to be fanned by curious personalities friendly with officials who should, at least, be at arm’s length from such antics.

The nefarious harm us, in some cases captured, prosecuted, sentenced, but seemingly never punished.  Nidal Hasan still draws breath.  Why?  Yet police officers doing their difficult jobs are more vilified than a mass murderer such as Hasan. 

We are told we must close Gitmo because its existence “makes more terrorists.”  Incarcerating those who attempt harm on our nation makes them mad.  So we release them, as an army of 30,000 fanatics pops up in the Middle East and undoes years of American efforts and nation-building. 

China and Japan are our largest creditors.  Two countries that were destitute just 70 years ago.  Our national debt is like a “homesick angel.”  Up and up goes the total as borrowing costs that normally would temper deficit spending are erased by a quasi-agency known as the Federal Reserve, magnificently powerful, yet unelected in a system that boasts representation as its foundation.

Laws on the books are disregarded by those who swore to enforce those laws, the president lies about insurance coverage and attacks on the Benghazi consulate.  Candidates break the law of record-keeping, and it seems to have no effect on the anyone’s popularity.

Attorneys general point to prosecutiorial discretion when they choose not to enforce laws with which they disagree.

There is good cause for the cattle to be nervous.  The ground is moving, and it is already raining.