The moral problem of in vitro fertilization

Although not a subject you’ll often hear discussed even in pro-life circles, in vitro fertilization is an evil that should be prohibited by law.  (I concede that it’s a pipe dream to think this will occur in the foreseeable future.)

Consider the recent story involving Hollywood celebrity Sofia Vergara.

From LifeNews.com:

Nick Loeb has filed a lawsuit against Modern Family actress Sofia Vergara in an attempt to stop her from destroying a pair of frozen embryos they created while they were engaged. In May 2014, the couple broke off their engagement after four years of dating. A source close to Loeb explained that he didn’t want to see the embryos destroyed because he’s always believed that life begins at conception. The couple created the embryos through in vitro fertilization.

Vergara said [in an interview with Howard Stern], ‘I totally understand him. Fortunately or unfortunately, there is law. You signed legal papers. If it was serious for him, this issue — which I totally respect is for someone — he should have taken it more seriously. There is a contract…Even if it’s life or not life, that’s not what he signed!’….

The dispute between Loeb and Vergara highlights one of the problems with in vitro fertilization, which is that unused or unwanted embryos are often discarded or destroyed… [I]n 2011, a study in the journal of the American Society for Reproductive Medicine revealed that 19% of unused embryos are discarded and 3% are donated for scientific research.

Indeed.  In addition to the practice itself being contrary to the natural law, it’s tragic that so many embryos – human lives with vast potential – are destroyed as a result of the practice.

As for Mr. Loeb: yes, it’s unfortunate that he and Ms. Vergara chose to pursue in vitro fertilization to begin with (not to mention doing so while unmarried), but he’s now trying to right a wrong, and I commend him for that.  Whether he’ll be successful with his lawsuit is another matter.  I’m no attorney, but it doesn’t look good.

I say: if you consider yourself pro-life, you should be opposed to in vitro fertilization.

Although not a subject you’ll often hear discussed even in pro-life circles, in vitro fertilization is an evil that should be prohibited by law.  (I concede that it’s a pipe dream to think this will occur in the foreseeable future.)

Consider the recent story involving Hollywood celebrity Sofia Vergara.

From LifeNews.com:

Nick Loeb has filed a lawsuit against Modern Family actress Sofia Vergara in an attempt to stop her from destroying a pair of frozen embryos they created while they were engaged. In May 2014, the couple broke off their engagement after four years of dating. A source close to Loeb explained that he didn’t want to see the embryos destroyed because he’s always believed that life begins at conception. The couple created the embryos through in vitro fertilization.

Vergara said [in an interview with Howard Stern], ‘I totally understand him. Fortunately or unfortunately, there is law. You signed legal papers. If it was serious for him, this issue — which I totally respect is for someone — he should have taken it more seriously. There is a contract…Even if it’s life or not life, that’s not what he signed!’….

The dispute between Loeb and Vergara highlights one of the problems with in vitro fertilization, which is that unused or unwanted embryos are often discarded or destroyed… [I]n 2011, a study in the journal of the American Society for Reproductive Medicine revealed that 19% of unused embryos are discarded and 3% are donated for scientific research.

Indeed.  In addition to the practice itself being contrary to the natural law, it’s tragic that so many embryos – human lives with vast potential – are destroyed as a result of the practice.

As for Mr. Loeb: yes, it’s unfortunate that he and Ms. Vergara chose to pursue in vitro fertilization to begin with (not to mention doing so while unmarried), but he’s now trying to right a wrong, and I commend him for that.  Whether he’ll be successful with his lawsuit is another matter.  I’m no attorney, but it doesn’t look good.

I say: if you consider yourself pro-life, you should be opposed to in vitro fertilization.