What the GOP can learn from the Church of Scientology

How about the idea of employing “best practices” that work, regardless of the source?

Out of the blue, I recently received a slickly produced magazine called Freedom.  I read it from cover to cover and found the stories compelling – mostly because they addressed real-world concerns in plain language that would appeal to a wide range of people.

Among the articles were these: “The Humam Cost of California’s Water Policy” (environmental elites run wild are ruining the lives of farmers and communities as they deprive them of water all to suit saving some fish); “People Who Read are a Dying Breed” about the deleterious impact on Americans – especially younger people – who no longer read nearly as much as in former times (with damage to their ability to think, reason, and write, and spell); the devious use of astroturfing on the internet (parties with an agenda flooding the internet with seemingly genuine opinions but with ulterior motives); the impact of contract research organizations on third-world countries (these are companies that run drug trials); and similar insightful, short columns.

I was wondering who produced the magazine and why it was mailed to me.  Only toward the very end was there the disclosure that this interesting and helpful and seemingly other-centered magazine was produced by the Church of Scientology.  I googled the name and discovered that the magazine has been around since 1968, publishing investigative columns on real-world concerns.

The columns were brief, well-written, rational, and interesting to read.

So why can’t the Republican Party and its leaders take some ideas from the Church of Scientology?  The spokesmen for the party leave much to be desired.  My own pet peeve is some of the inside-the-Beltway language used that is lost on or offensive to most Americans.  For example, when Republicans talk about delivering a “clean bill” to Barack Obama to sign, what does that even mean?

This was Reagan’s genius – he was able to relate to everyday Americans in language and ideas that resonated with them.  Too few Republicans have that ability.  Does Jeb Bush, who was to the manor born and bred in Ivy League environments?  Marco Rubio certainly can make the case with language and principles that strike a chord in people.

Republicans need a Main Street appeal, and the best way to accomplish this is to pursue an agenda that helps the vast middle class and communicate that is the primary goal of the party in messages that people find as interesting and compelling as columns that can be found in a Church of Scientology magazine.

How about the idea of employing “best practices” that work, regardless of the source?

Out of the blue, I recently received a slickly produced magazine called Freedom.  I read it from cover to cover and found the stories compelling – mostly because they addressed real-world concerns in plain language that would appeal to a wide range of people.

Among the articles were these: “The Humam Cost of California’s Water Policy” (environmental elites run wild are ruining the lives of farmers and communities as they deprive them of water all to suit saving some fish); “People Who Read are a Dying Breed” about the deleterious impact on Americans – especially younger people – who no longer read nearly as much as in former times (with damage to their ability to think, reason, and write, and spell); the devious use of astroturfing on the internet (parties with an agenda flooding the internet with seemingly genuine opinions but with ulterior motives); the impact of contract research organizations on third-world countries (these are companies that run drug trials); and similar insightful, short columns.

I was wondering who produced the magazine and why it was mailed to me.  Only toward the very end was there the disclosure that this interesting and helpful and seemingly other-centered magazine was produced by the Church of Scientology.  I googled the name and discovered that the magazine has been around since 1968, publishing investigative columns on real-world concerns.

The columns were brief, well-written, rational, and interesting to read.

So why can’t the Republican Party and its leaders take some ideas from the Church of Scientology?  The spokesmen for the party leave much to be desired.  My own pet peeve is some of the inside-the-Beltway language used that is lost on or offensive to most Americans.  For example, when Republicans talk about delivering a “clean bill” to Barack Obama to sign, what does that even mean?

This was Reagan’s genius – he was able to relate to everyday Americans in language and ideas that resonated with them.  Too few Republicans have that ability.  Does Jeb Bush, who was to the manor born and bred in Ivy League environments?  Marco Rubio certainly can make the case with language and principles that strike a chord in people.

Republicans need a Main Street appeal, and the best way to accomplish this is to pursue an agenda that helps the vast middle class and communicate that is the primary goal of the party in messages that people find as interesting and compelling as columns that can be found in a Church of Scientology magazine.