The voice from the river

From their testimony, four people heard a voice asking for help that compelled them to search an overturned, half-submerged vehicle in search of the source of that voice, and when they searched the vehicle, they found the voiceless, dead body of a young woman and a voiceless, live baby that was nearly dead.

Saul of Tarsus heard such a voice from the void (and saw something), and, from that, he gave us the roots of most Christian theology.

The Church of Our Fathers understands both voices, but I don’t think that the Church of today understands, either.

I recently wrote about Faith and the Church of today.

That piece received, for me, an unprecedented level of comments and e-mails for which I am quite grateful and informed.

To those who wrote, I can say that the reason I can neither confess the Faith of my youth nor avow atheism or agnosticism is that I see more questions than answers in the universe as I can see it and as others describe it.  And yet, I see answers, albeit inexplicable ones.

I first quit accepting the invitation to Communion because I could no longer acknowledge that the “resurrection of the body” was something that was explicable to me and that the Navy chaplains with whom I worked, golfed, and conversed had a difficult time trying to explain to me. 

Interminable other questions are either inexplicable or fully explicable within the context of Judeo-Christian teachings (such as the Singularity).

And then, once in a while, something, that Voice from the River, comes along that is both inexplicable in the universe as I and most people can see it and that is fully explicable within the context of Judeo-Christian teachings.

What do you think of the Voice from the River?

The author is retired, his profile may be found on LinkedIn, and comments may be addressed at bilschan@hotmail.com.

From their testimony, four people heard a voice asking for help that compelled them to search an overturned, half-submerged vehicle in search of the source of that voice, and when they searched the vehicle, they found the voiceless, dead body of a young woman and a voiceless, live baby that was nearly dead.

Saul of Tarsus heard such a voice from the void (and saw something), and, from that, he gave us the roots of most Christian theology.

The Church of Our Fathers understands both voices, but I don’t think that the Church of today understands, either.

I recently wrote about Faith and the Church of today.

That piece received, for me, an unprecedented level of comments and e-mails for which I am quite grateful and informed.

To those who wrote, I can say that the reason I can neither confess the Faith of my youth nor avow atheism or agnosticism is that I see more questions than answers in the universe as I can see it and as others describe it.  And yet, I see answers, albeit inexplicable ones.

I first quit accepting the invitation to Communion because I could no longer acknowledge that the “resurrection of the body” was something that was explicable to me and that the Navy chaplains with whom I worked, golfed, and conversed had a difficult time trying to explain to me. 

Interminable other questions are either inexplicable or fully explicable within the context of Judeo-Christian teachings (such as the Singularity).

And then, once in a while, something, that Voice from the River, comes along that is both inexplicable in the universe as I and most people can see it and that is fully explicable within the context of Judeo-Christian teachings.

What do you think of the Voice from the River?

The author is retired, his profile may be found on LinkedIn, and comments may be addressed at bilschan@hotmail.com.