Putin sticks a ship in the middle of U.S.-Cuba talks

We can say that the KGB must have taught its graduates like Mr Putin how to mix a little humor with Realpolitik.  I guess that the crew of that Russian ship must be strolling the streets of Havana singing that old Beatles tune: "I don't want to spoil the party so I'll go...."

The U.S.-Cuba "thaw" just got a bit more strange now that a Russian ship docked in Havana:

US officials in Washington played down the presence of the Russian vessel, saying it was perfectly legal and not at all out of the ordinary.

Of course, it's legal, but that's not the point.  Saying that it's legal just proves that we are weak.  Sadly, no one fears or respects the Obama administration.

This is another "in your face, Obama" from Mr. Putin:

The Viktor Leonov, an armed intelligence-gathering vessel that monitors US communications, arrived at a passenger cruise terminal in full public view for what a Russian embassy official called a “friendly” three-day stay.

The port call came on the same day that Kremlin defence minister Sergei Shoigu announced plans for Russia to extend its global military footprint with new bases in a number of countries, including Vietnam, Cuba, Venezuela and Nicaragua.

Mr Putin seemed to be sending a typically blunt message about Russia’s influence with its communist Caribbean ally by timing the vessel’s visit to coincide with this week’s trip by a US team led by Roberta Jacobson, the assistant secretary of state.

Since the "thaw" was announced, a couple of dissidents released were re-arrested.   

The Castro government has not made a single concession on freedom or property rights.     

Remember access to internet mentioned by President Obama?

The Castro regime arrested a man who wanted to turn on the internet on the island:

Leinier Cruz Salfran, a Cuban computer expert, recently got around financial and other limits on access to the Internet by turning his laptop into a "hot spot," allowing other Cubans high-speed access to the Internet.

The result?

Cruz, 34, was arrested.

And now a Russian spy ship comes to the island to pay a visit.  Is this the same ship that was spying off the Atlantic coast in 2014?   

Am I the only person who thinks that this deal is a bit of a one-way street?  We throw out the window a policy toward Cuba enforced by every president from JFK to George W. Bush.  We change, but the Cuban government shows no sign of changing.

PS: You can hear my show (CantoTalk) or follow me on Twitter.

We can say that the KGB must have taught its graduates like Mr Putin how to mix a little humor with Realpolitik.  I guess that the crew of that Russian ship must be strolling the streets of Havana singing that old Beatles tune: "I don't want to spoil the party so I'll go...."

The U.S.-Cuba "thaw" just got a bit more strange now that a Russian ship docked in Havana:

US officials in Washington played down the presence of the Russian vessel, saying it was perfectly legal and not at all out of the ordinary.

Of course, it's legal, but that's not the point.  Saying that it's legal just proves that we are weak.  Sadly, no one fears or respects the Obama administration.

This is another "in your face, Obama" from Mr. Putin:

The Viktor Leonov, an armed intelligence-gathering vessel that monitors US communications, arrived at a passenger cruise terminal in full public view for what a Russian embassy official called a “friendly” three-day stay.

The port call came on the same day that Kremlin defence minister Sergei Shoigu announced plans for Russia to extend its global military footprint with new bases in a number of countries, including Vietnam, Cuba, Venezuela and Nicaragua.

Mr Putin seemed to be sending a typically blunt message about Russia’s influence with its communist Caribbean ally by timing the vessel’s visit to coincide with this week’s trip by a US team led by Roberta Jacobson, the assistant secretary of state.

Since the "thaw" was announced, a couple of dissidents released were re-arrested.   

The Castro government has not made a single concession on freedom or property rights.     

Remember access to internet mentioned by President Obama?

The Castro regime arrested a man who wanted to turn on the internet on the island:

Leinier Cruz Salfran, a Cuban computer expert, recently got around financial and other limits on access to the Internet by turning his laptop into a "hot spot," allowing other Cubans high-speed access to the Internet.

The result?

Cruz, 34, was arrested.

And now a Russian spy ship comes to the island to pay a visit.  Is this the same ship that was spying off the Atlantic coast in 2014?   

Am I the only person who thinks that this deal is a bit of a one-way street?  We throw out the window a policy toward Cuba enforced by every president from JFK to George W. Bush.  We change, but the Cuban government shows no sign of changing.

PS: You can hear my show (CantoTalk) or follow me on Twitter.