AG nominee Lynch: pro-death penalty, anti-marijuana?

An interesting tidbit buried fourteen paragraphs into this New York Times story:

On matters of policy, Ms. Lynch [pictured] called capital punishment "an effective penalty" and said she disagreed with Mr. Obama's statements that marijuana was no more harmful than alcohol. She called the National Security Agency's collection of American phone records "certainly constitutional, and effective."

One has to wonder how many liberals were paying attention to this nit in Lynch's confirmation hearing, and how many among those will be happy to hear Obama's potential new attorney general extolling the death penalty.  Same goes for certain Coloradans toking up as this piece goes to print.  The NSA comment, if spread around, may well infuriate everyone, party affiliation notwithstanding.

Neither liberals nor conservatives should take too much stock in these remarks, however.  It's fair to surmise that Lynch is just saying what she needs to say to the Republican-controlled Judiciary Committee get confirmed – although, as the Times portrays the Republicans, it looks as though she can say almost anything she wants from here on out.

Lindsey Graham (R-SC): "From my point of view, you've acquitted yourself very well."

Orrin Hatch (R-Utah): "I'm impressed with your qualifications, and I hope I can support your nomination."

The Times also calls John Cornyn (R-Tex.) "a Republican who allies of Ms. Lynch believe could be persuaded to vote for her confirmation," with Jeff Flake (R-Ariz.) another "possible confirmation vote[]."  Jeff Sessions (R-Ala.), Ted Cruz (R-Tex.), and David Vitter (R-La.) are described as offering a bit more push-back.

It's fun to contrast the measured praise of the sympathetic Republicans above with the fulsome praise of their Democratic counterparts.  The Times quotes Sheldon Whitehouse (D-RI) calling Lynch's "a flawless performance," along with Richard Blumenthal (D-Conn.) branding it "among the most accomplished and impressive that I've seen as a member of this committee."

There's a metaphor here for Americans suspicious of political parties: Democrats drive the country off the cliff at breakneck speed, while Republicans do it a little slower.  "I hope I can support your nomination."

On the other hand, Whitehouse's and Blumenthal's comments doubtless came after Lynch's pronouncements on the death penalty, marijuana, and clandestine government record-gathering.  Is a new pro-execution, anti-pot, pro-NSA Democratic Party ascending?  Time will tell...

Drew Belsky is American Thinker's deputy editor.  Contact him at drew@americanthinker.com, and follow him on Twitter @DJB627.

An interesting tidbit buried fourteen paragraphs into this New York Times story:

On matters of policy, Ms. Lynch [pictured] called capital punishment "an effective penalty" and said she disagreed with Mr. Obama's statements that marijuana was no more harmful than alcohol. She called the National Security Agency's collection of American phone records "certainly constitutional, and effective."

One has to wonder how many liberals were paying attention to this nit in Lynch's confirmation hearing, and how many among those will be happy to hear Obama's potential new attorney general extolling the death penalty.  Same goes for certain Coloradans toking up as this piece goes to print.  The NSA comment, if spread around, may well infuriate everyone, party affiliation notwithstanding.

Neither liberals nor conservatives should take too much stock in these remarks, however.  It's fair to surmise that Lynch is just saying what she needs to say to the Republican-controlled Judiciary Committee get confirmed – although, as the Times portrays the Republicans, it looks as though she can say almost anything she wants from here on out.

Lindsey Graham (R-SC): "From my point of view, you've acquitted yourself very well."

Orrin Hatch (R-Utah): "I'm impressed with your qualifications, and I hope I can support your nomination."

The Times also calls John Cornyn (R-Tex.) "a Republican who allies of Ms. Lynch believe could be persuaded to vote for her confirmation," with Jeff Flake (R-Ariz.) another "possible confirmation vote[]."  Jeff Sessions (R-Ala.), Ted Cruz (R-Tex.), and David Vitter (R-La.) are described as offering a bit more push-back.

It's fun to contrast the measured praise of the sympathetic Republicans above with the fulsome praise of their Democratic counterparts.  The Times quotes Sheldon Whitehouse (D-RI) calling Lynch's "a flawless performance," along with Richard Blumenthal (D-Conn.) branding it "among the most accomplished and impressive that I've seen as a member of this committee."

There's a metaphor here for Americans suspicious of political parties: Democrats drive the country off the cliff at breakneck speed, while Republicans do it a little slower.  "I hope I can support your nomination."

On the other hand, Whitehouse's and Blumenthal's comments doubtless came after Lynch's pronouncements on the death penalty, marijuana, and clandestine government record-gathering.  Is a new pro-execution, anti-pot, pro-NSA Democratic Party ascending?  Time will tell...

Drew Belsky is American Thinker's deputy editor.  Contact him at drew@americanthinker.com, and follow him on Twitter @DJB627.