Raising a generation of children dependent on the state

In contemporary America, the notion has taken hold that the state, not parents, should be responsible for feeding children brought into this world. After all, “It takes a village,” doesn’t it, in the new America of liberalism?

Have you seen (or heard) this commercial, currently playing on TV (and radio)?

It’s from “Feeding America”, and it’s been running most of the summer. It tells us that kids miss the free lunches they get while attending school. The commercial tells us to go to feedingamerica.org “to find out how to get free lunches during the summer.”

The commercial features a bunch of different kids, each one repeating “I wish I was in school!”

“I wish I was in school!”; “I wish I was in school!”; “I wish I was in school!”

I, too, wish these kids (and the writers and producers of the commercial) were in school; particularly in English class. If they were in school, they might be learning how and when to use the subjunctive case.

Author’s Note: Stu Tarlowe learned English grammar in the NYC Public Schools a half-century or so ago, and seriously wonders if it is still being taught anywhere.

In contemporary America, the notion has taken hold that the state, not parents, should be responsible for feeding children brought into this world. After all, “It takes a village,” doesn’t it, in the new America of liberalism?

Have you seen (or heard) this commercial, currently playing on TV (and radio)?

It’s from “Feeding America”, and it’s been running most of the summer. It tells us that kids miss the free lunches they get while attending school. The commercial tells us to go to feedingamerica.org “to find out how to get free lunches during the summer.”

The commercial features a bunch of different kids, each one repeating “I wish I was in school!”

“I wish I was in school!”; “I wish I was in school!”; “I wish I was in school!”

I, too, wish these kids (and the writers and producers of the commercial) were in school; particularly in English class. If they were in school, they might be learning how and when to use the subjunctive case.

Author’s Note: Stu Tarlowe learned English grammar in the NYC Public Schools a half-century or so ago, and seriously wonders if it is still being taught anywhere.