Head of Homeland Security Links Ebola to Black Power

On September 10, 2014, 10 days before Ebola victim number one, Thomas Eric Duncan,  landed in Dallas, Texas from Liberia, the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Secretary Jeh Johnson, ironically named for 'Chief Jeh,' a Liberian tribal leader who befriended his grandfather in 1930, spoke to members of the Council on Foreign Relations.

Before the presenter opened the floor to questions on ISIS, Ebola and homegrown terrorism, Johnson made a few brief remarks, first on DHS's responsibilities, including border security and protection against nuclear, chemical and biological threats.

After introducing DHS as the third-largest department of the government, the man whose family tree is laden  with civil rights activists, associations with communist sympathizers, members of the Party, and one abortionist uncle, proceeded to reference Marxist, black power author Stokely Carmichael and radical leftist professor Charles Hamilton.

From CFR.org

Our American history, old and recent, is riddled with unfortunate examples in which our government in the name of national security has gone too far.

Long before this nation honored Martin Luther King with a national holiday and a street named for him in virtually every major city, he was the target of government surveillance and harassment.

Professor Charles V. Hamilton, retired from Columbia University, is one of the most respected political scientists in the United States and a member of this Council. In the 1960s, he coauthored the book "Black Power" with Stokely Carmichael and was suspected of being a dangerous subversive by his own government. More recent and in reaction to 9/11, our government engaged in enhanced interrogation techniques, contrary to who we are as a great nation.

The head of Homeland Security attacks America in a speech on how to protect its citizens from ISIS, terror threats and biological warfare? Moreover, Johnson doesn't even mention Ebola despite it being one of the main reasons for his appearance -- a point two audience members address in their questions afterwards.

QUESTION: Thank you. Claude Erbsen, INNOVATION International. Mr. Secretary, I haven't heard the word "Ebola" spoken. You're responsible for the borders and all that goes with it. What do you think can be done, will be done, should be done, in terms of protecting the country from one guy or two people coming in on an airplane?

JOHNSON: Good question. You're correct. I did not refer to Ebola in my remarks, but I definitely refer to Ebola in my daily job. It's part of the day job.

I get briefings on it almost on a daily basis. And it is a virus that, as you know, is growing in West Africa and the three countries in West Africa. There is a certain level of screening that is done of those who are leaving the country, getting on planes at airports there. From the three most affected countries, my understanding is there's no direct flights to the United States. You have to go through about three or four different transit points.

And what I've asked my staff to look at is whether, in addition to what we're already doing, there's more that we should do and we can do that is reasonable and responsible to screen people for any signs of the disease -- of the virus as they're leaving, as -- you know, so that what you've mentioned doesn't happen. I think we need to continually evaluate that, and we are.

QUESTION: Thank you very much. My name is Nina Schwalbe, and I work in the field of public health, and I have another question on Ebola. So this is an epidemic that is ravaging, as you know, in the three countries. And with every case we identify, we know that there's somewhere between 10 and 100 people that that person has had contact with.

So in addition to the work that you're doing on airport screening and kind of who's coming in, tell us about your thinking about the role of your department in actually working in those high-burden countries or in those ravaging epidemics to try and stem the flow.

JOHNSON: My department itself should be focused on the homeland. We have a health affairs capability in the Department of Homeland Security. Obviously, there's CDC, Centers for Disease Control, which I know is heavily engaged in this situation. HHS in general, I know, is very engaged in this. And I -- collaboratively together, we've got a job to do.

And there are a number of U.S. government personnel on the continent right now addressing this. And as I mentioned a moment ago, I think we need to continually evaluate the need for screening at last point of departure at airports before people leave the countries.

Apart from Johnson’s surreal connection to Liberia via his grandfather’s League of Nations trip in 1930 to look into its forced labor practices, his cognitively dissonant adulation of Carmichael and Hamilton may reveal the Secretary’s real motive in refusing to restrict travel from West Africa.

In short, Johnson is an advocate of ‘black power’ politics. Unfortunately he’s not the only one. Michelle Obama based her 1985 Princeton thesis on Carmichael and Hamilton’s book which preached the rejection of assimilation, white middle-class values, nonviolence, and coalition building.

Carmichael came up with the catchy ‘black power’ rallying cry to mean just that -- the acquisition of power by blacks. Inspired by Marxism and egged on by the Communist Party USA, militant activists like Carmichael sought to uproot what they perceived to be a racist-based, exploitative, capitalist system.

If our Homeland Secretary was not on board with the black power movement, why would he bring up Carmichael and Hamilton’s book in September, 2014 -- 48 years after Carmichael coined the term and a week before a sick Liberian was allowed into the country?

Why would leftist media like the Guardian be pushing Ebola as America’s fear of “African-ness” and “blackness?”

While Americans scratch their heads in disbelief over this administration’s seeming ineptitude over Ebola, the long-dead communist Carmichael’s dream of sticking it to ‘whitey’ via the White House and its apparatchiks is coming true.

Read more Evans at ExZoom.net

On September 10, 2014, 10 days before Ebola victim number one, Thomas Eric Duncan,  landed in Dallas, Texas from Liberia, the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Secretary Jeh Johnson, ironically named for 'Chief Jeh,' a Liberian tribal leader who befriended his grandfather in 1930, spoke to members of the Council on Foreign Relations.

Before the presenter opened the floor to questions on ISIS, Ebola and homegrown terrorism, Johnson made a few brief remarks, first on DHS's responsibilities, including border security and protection against nuclear, chemical and biological threats.

After introducing DHS as the third-largest department of the government, the man whose family tree is laden  with civil rights activists, associations with communist sympathizers, members of the Party, and one abortionist uncle, proceeded to reference Marxist, black power author Stokely Carmichael and radical leftist professor Charles Hamilton.

From CFR.org

Our American history, old and recent, is riddled with unfortunate examples in which our government in the name of national security has gone too far.

Long before this nation honored Martin Luther King with a national holiday and a street named for him in virtually every major city, he was the target of government surveillance and harassment.

Professor Charles V. Hamilton, retired from Columbia University, is one of the most respected political scientists in the United States and a member of this Council. In the 1960s, he coauthored the book "Black Power" with Stokely Carmichael and was suspected of being a dangerous subversive by his own government. More recent and in reaction to 9/11, our government engaged in enhanced interrogation techniques, contrary to who we are as a great nation.

The head of Homeland Security attacks America in a speech on how to protect its citizens from ISIS, terror threats and biological warfare? Moreover, Johnson doesn't even mention Ebola despite it being one of the main reasons for his appearance -- a point two audience members address in their questions afterwards.

QUESTION: Thank you. Claude Erbsen, INNOVATION International. Mr. Secretary, I haven't heard the word "Ebola" spoken. You're responsible for the borders and all that goes with it. What do you think can be done, will be done, should be done, in terms of protecting the country from one guy or two people coming in on an airplane?

JOHNSON: Good question. You're correct. I did not refer to Ebola in my remarks, but I definitely refer to Ebola in my daily job. It's part of the day job.

I get briefings on it almost on a daily basis. And it is a virus that, as you know, is growing in West Africa and the three countries in West Africa. There is a certain level of screening that is done of those who are leaving the country, getting on planes at airports there. From the three most affected countries, my understanding is there's no direct flights to the United States. You have to go through about three or four different transit points.

And what I've asked my staff to look at is whether, in addition to what we're already doing, there's more that we should do and we can do that is reasonable and responsible to screen people for any signs of the disease -- of the virus as they're leaving, as -- you know, so that what you've mentioned doesn't happen. I think we need to continually evaluate that, and we are.

QUESTION: Thank you very much. My name is Nina Schwalbe, and I work in the field of public health, and I have another question on Ebola. So this is an epidemic that is ravaging, as you know, in the three countries. And with every case we identify, we know that there's somewhere between 10 and 100 people that that person has had contact with.

So in addition to the work that you're doing on airport screening and kind of who's coming in, tell us about your thinking about the role of your department in actually working in those high-burden countries or in those ravaging epidemics to try and stem the flow.

JOHNSON: My department itself should be focused on the homeland. We have a health affairs capability in the Department of Homeland Security. Obviously, there's CDC, Centers for Disease Control, which I know is heavily engaged in this situation. HHS in general, I know, is very engaged in this. And I -- collaboratively together, we've got a job to do.

And there are a number of U.S. government personnel on the continent right now addressing this. And as I mentioned a moment ago, I think we need to continually evaluate the need for screening at last point of departure at airports before people leave the countries.

Apart from Johnson’s surreal connection to Liberia via his grandfather’s League of Nations trip in 1930 to look into its forced labor practices, his cognitively dissonant adulation of Carmichael and Hamilton may reveal the Secretary’s real motive in refusing to restrict travel from West Africa.

In short, Johnson is an advocate of ‘black power’ politics. Unfortunately he’s not the only one. Michelle Obama based her 1985 Princeton thesis on Carmichael and Hamilton’s book which preached the rejection of assimilation, white middle-class values, nonviolence, and coalition building.

Carmichael came up with the catchy ‘black power’ rallying cry to mean just that -- the acquisition of power by blacks. Inspired by Marxism and egged on by the Communist Party USA, militant activists like Carmichael sought to uproot what they perceived to be a racist-based, exploitative, capitalist system.

If our Homeland Secretary was not on board with the black power movement, why would he bring up Carmichael and Hamilton’s book in September, 2014 -- 48 years after Carmichael coined the term and a week before a sick Liberian was allowed into the country?

Why would leftist media like the Guardian be pushing Ebola as America’s fear of “African-ness” and “blackness?”

While Americans scratch their heads in disbelief over this administration’s seeming ineptitude over Ebola, the long-dead communist Carmichael’s dream of sticking it to ‘whitey’ via the White House and its apparatchiks is coming true.

Read more Evans at ExZoom.net